PBS Newsletter

Archives

2013

JAN.
FEB.
MAR.
APR.
MAY
JUNE
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC.

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January 2013

January Meeting

From Randy Naftal, our Exhibit Chair;
Time to get ready for the Flower Show. We will choose 10 trees to be exhibited this year as we changed the layout to accommodate all concerns from last year.
Please bring the tree you want to display in this years show to work on and do the final touches. Also you can get some additional advice on areas you feel may need improvement. A few extra eyes always helps.In addition, please bring the stand that you want to use in the display.
If you are not exhibiting, bring a tree to work on anyway since this is a workshop and all are welcome.
Looking forward to seeing you all at the workshop!
Randall Naftal

If you wish to just get some hints or help on a tree, please bring it - there will be lots of help available. If you want an evaluation of a tree, this is a great time to do it. Many bonsai are just a tiny bit of effort away from being show quality - if yours isn't quite ready, you can get some tips and help toward making the tree one for the Exhibit.
We need exhibit trees for the show, and this is an excellent time to see what is involved with showing a bonsai.

PBS Workshop
Date: Saturday, January 19
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 10:00 am - 1 pm

December Meeting

Our final meeting of 2012 featured our Holiday Social, and we ended the year with a great celebration.
Karen Harkaway whet all of our appetites for a trip to Japan with her photos of her trip in 2010. The nurseries and studios in Japan are simply phenomenal!
Our gift raffles provided a good deal of suspense and anticipation, with everyone wondering what surprises were contain in the artfully wrapped packages. The gifts didn't disappoint and the suspense lasted until the last gift was opened. Mike Wigginton was the big winner of the evening, finding the MABS registration in the final gift.
Thanks to all the members who brought in goodies to share, and to Karen for a great program. Special thanks to Jim Gillespie, who provided this year's gifts from his Sho Fu En Bonsai studio.
President's Notes
I hope to see many of you at the workshop on January 19th. Come and visit with those working on trees or bring one and get advice as you work. Remember, your tree does not have to be a candidate for the Flower Show. It can be a tree that you are developing.
During the workshop, raffle tickets for a MidAtlantic registration will be sold. Tickets will also be sold at the February meeting and the drawing will take place at the end of that meeting. You do not have to be present to win. It is requested that you write your name on the stub of your ticket before you place it in the can. It will help to identify the winner if they are not present. The usually raffle price is in effect ($2 each or 3 for $5). No double tickets will be available for this drawing. MidAtlantic brochures have not yet been mailed out due to a rescheduling problem. One will be mailed to you as soon as they arrive.
The Flower Show schedule will also be available (I promise to remember it). If you want a certain day or time, call me (610-948-6380) and I will sign you up. Remember that 2 free tickets to the show are provided for helping at the exhibit for 3 hours.
See you on the 19th!
Linda

Flower Show Notes

During an Executive Board meeting, it was discovered (some of our board members did not have this information) that it has been quite a while since the expectations for the Flower Show sitters have been shared. This article will inform our newer members and remind our experienced sitters of those expectations.
1. The first purpose of manning the exhibit is to provide an extra layer of protection for the trees and display objects. There is substantial Flower Show security even though the public (and PBS members) are often unaware of it, but having PBS members there reinforces the security. The second purpose is to educate the public about bonsai. Talk to people as much as possible. If there is a question that you can not answer, write it in the notebook and take contact information. Someone from PBS will email or call them with the answer as soon as possible. The third purpose is to promote membership in PBS. If you keep brochures in your hand as you walk around, you can easily hand one out. Tell the public about the interesting meetings that we have and share any insight as to how the club has helped you.
2. The reason two tickets are provided is that we want you to have extra eyes and help during your sitting time. Sometimes in spite of the best efforts to schedule sufficient sitters, you will be the only PBS member on duty. Your guest can sit at the PBS station and keep eyes on the exhibit while you engage people. Even though the guest might not know anything about bonsai, they still can cover for you if you need to leave the exhibit for any time at all. Please try not to leave the exhibit unmanned.
3. The exhibit is different this year, more sitter friendly than last year. Coats and other personal belongings can be tucked under the Rosade Bonsai Studio table. Also, look there for watering cans, misters and our notebook. My cell phone number can be found in the notebook if there are any problems to report. Randy Naftal is in and out during the day and may ask your assistance in watering. The schedule is there so that if a sitter does not show up, you can call them and find out what is happening. If you determine ahead of time that you can not sit, call me as soon as possible. We do have members who can cover in an emergency, or Jim and I can go down.
4. Apparel with the PBS logo will be provided this year instead of name badges to make our members more visible to the public. Please wear one and pass it on to the next sitter. The last shift of sitters can leave them with the notebook under the Rosade table.
Thanks to all the PBS sitters. You make it possible for PBS to exhibit in the Philadelphia Flower Show. Enjoy the show!

Future Meetings

February 15 - Sharee Solow - Japanese Gardens
March 2-10 - PBS Exhibit Sitting - Philadelphia Flower Show
April 26 - Member's BYO Workshop

MidAtlantic Festival

Registrations have been delayed for this year's MABS Spring Festival, but should be in the mail very shortly.
This month's MABS focus is on Minoru Akiyama, from Japan. Minoru, age 33, is a second generation bonsai artist from Nirasaki in Yamanashi Prefecture. After graduating from high school, Minoru apprenticed for six years under Kunio Kobayashi at Shunkaen. After completing his apprenticeship in 2003, Minoru quickly established himself as a rising star in the Japanese Bonsai community. At age 29, he was the youngest person ever to win the Prime Minister’s award at the Sakafu exhibition, the highest accolade for a professional bonsai artist. He won this award again in 2011, both times using junipers collected by his father, a renowned yamadori collector. He has won many other awards at Sakafu and won the top prize at Kojuten, the professional Satsuki exhibition. Well versed in all species of trees, he specializes in Junipers, Taxus, Prunus, Azalea and White Pines.
On Friday afternoon, Mr. Akiyama will conduct a “bring your own tree” workshop. On Saturday, he will present a lecture/demo on a large San Jose Juniper. On Sunday morning, using materials provided by MABS members, he will conduct at lecture/demo on Keido, the art of exhibiting bonsai.
Please mark your calendars and make plans to attend the 2013 MABS Festival, April 19-21, 2013 at Grantville, PA.
Don't forget, PBS will be raffling off a full registration to the 2013 Festival. Ticket will be on sale at the January and February meetings, with the drawing at the conclusion of February's program.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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February 2013

February Meeting

In keeping with Asian arts, our February meeting will feature one of our members, Sharee Solow. Her topic for the evening will be focused on Japanese Gardens and Japanese Bonsai Inspiration. Last February, Sharee completed an intensive seminar for several weeks in Japan where she earned certificates in garden design history, construction, and maintenance. While in Japan she took the opportunity to visit a number of bonsai gardens, thus her program's dual topics of bonsai and Japanese gardens.
Ms. Solow holds degrees in theater (BFA), marketing (MS), landscape architecture (BS), and horticulture (BS) to create digital landscape designs for commercial, institutional and residential environments. This broad background is coupled with extensive travel experiences, together forming the aesthetic palate needed to handle the diverse creative demands found in clients' outdoor spaces. She is currently the program chair for the Hardy Plant Society, a Temple University Ambler Arboretum board member, and a past board member of PA/DE ASLA and Penn State Extension. Also, she has been a guest judge for the PLNA: ALE Awards, PA Garden Expo and juried for Temple University and Philadelphia University. Professional groups she is active with are PPA, GWA, ASLA and APLD.
We are looking forward to an extensive photo travelog, some great gardens and bonsai.
Don't forget the drawing for the full MidAtlantic registration will take place.
Be sure to bring a bonsai in for discussion or to exhibit and double your raffle tickets (MABS raffle excluded).

Guest Speaker: Sharee Solow
Date: Friday, February 15
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7 pm

Future Meetings
March 2-10 - PBS Exhibit Sitting - Philadelphia Flower Show
April 26 - Member's BYO Workshop
May 17 - Ted Matson -Lecture/Demo

January Workshop

Our January workshop benefitted from a beautiful, sunny morning which unfortunately, did nothing to raise the temperature outdoors. Indoors, however, there was plenty of warmth in the smiles of the members attending the workshop, equal to the sunlight streaming in the windows. Quite a few very nice trees were brought in to be groomed, refined, wired and discussed. Fine details, branch placement, soil surface, jin treatment, and pot selection were all part of the day's topics. Lots of help and advice were given throughout the session. Since the exhibit is all about display, some of the basics and finer points of display were brought up in discussions.
While not all of the trees were ready for the Flower Show exhibit this year, those not selected showed great potential for future exhibits.
We had a great turnout, and the three hour session literally flew by!

President's Notes

Thanks to all who came out to the January workshop. Some of the trees were chosen for the Flower Show and some were just works in progress. It is nice to get other opinions of your efforts. Since Jim and I are often working on trees at the same time, we can offer opinions (wanted or not) to each other. But we see each other's trees all the time. It always amazes me when I take a workshop or someone else sees one of my trees for the first time and says, "Have you ever considered this?" and come up with an entirely different way of looking at the tree. It makes me want to kick myself and I always think, " Why didn't I see that?" I also like to look at trees in exhibits and think what I would do with that tree.
That is why you should definitely get to MidAtlantic if you are able. There will be two exhibits there. The first is the club exhibit which features trees from each of the member clubs. The second exhibit is the Professional Exhibit - trees designed by folks who are more advanced than most of us. If you can take a critique, you will hear one of the featured artists comment on those trees, pointing out strengths and weaknesses. It is a real learning experience.
See you at February's meeting. Last chance to win a full registration to MidAtlantic.
Linda

Flower Show Notes

There were a number of concerns expressed by our sitters with last year's exhibit design. Those concerns were addressed with the Show designer and it's hoped that this year's design will alleviate the problems we experienced last year.
All the trees will face toward the center of the exhibit, a seating area has been provided for "meet and greet" and traffic flow has been addressed. This exhibit provides for six trees in the moon gates and four trees in a center garden on pedestals. A rough drawing is shown below.
Exhibit sitters will have a new look too. Rather than the rather small bolos or name tags used in past years, we now have some Kelly green pocket aprons with a large PBS logo on the front. Visitors should be able to find PBS docents quite easily in order to ask questions.

MidAtlantic Festival

Registration form have been mailed for this year's MABS Spring Festival.
This month's MABS focus is on Peter Warren from the UK, grew up in the North Yorkshire, UK countryside and studied Astrophysics at Leicester University. He became captivated with bonsai on a recreational trip to Japan. He did a five-year apprenticeship with Kunio Kobayashi at Shunkaen in Tokyo, Japan. Minoru Akiyama was still an apprentice at Shunkaen at the time and was a massively influential figure in Peter’s education. Peter returned to the UK and opened his own studio, Saruyama (literally: “monkey mountain”), dedicating himself to spreading knowledge of bonsai in the west. He has been featured demonstrator at a number of European and American conventions and returns to Japan several times a year to polish up his skills and to repay his debt to Mr. Kobayashi. He favors an elegant and more classical style of tree and takes a pragmatic approach to bonsai design and cultivation, preferring to draw out the character of the tree rather than impose one upon it. Equally happy working with deciduous trees and conifers, his favorite species include Junipers, Spruce, Rosemary and anything a little more unusual.
On Friday afternoon, Peter will conduct a workshop using Pinus densiflora x nigra “Jane Kluis,” a fine, thick-trunked pine which buds back well. Peter will conduct lecture/demonstrations on Saturday and Sunday, working on a collected American Larch and another tree to be selected.
Please mark your calendars and make plans to attend the 2013 MABS Festival, April 19-21, 2013 at Grantville, PA.
Don't forget, PBS will be raffling off a full registration to the 2013 Festival. Ticket will be on sale at the February meeting, with the drawing at the conclusion of February's program.

What to do on these winter days??

Sharpen tools - Inventory supplies (wire, fertilizer, screens, bonsai soil, etc.) - Read a bonsai book - Check the web for new bonsai sites or visit favorites - Do some wiring (be sure branches are thawed) - Build some bonsai benches - Go shopping for display items - Take some photos of winter silhouettes - Get your bonsai records up to date - Organize for repotting - Have some bonsai fun!!!!

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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March/April 2013

April Meeting

Many of us are anxiously awaiting the arrival of spring in order to begin work on our bonsai. April's meeting will provide members an opportunity to work on their bonsai as well as get help or information on their trees from veteran members. Please bring a tree, whether a tree just starting out on its bonsai experience, or one that has seen several years of development. We won't be able to do repotting, but wiring and pruning are definitely the order of the day, so bring whatever tolls and wire you think you may need.
Lots of fun, lots of learning - both are in store for our April Workshop.

Member's Workshop
Date: Friday, April 26
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7 pm

Future Meetings
May 17 - Ted Matson -Lecture/Demo
June 21 - Robert Mahler -Lecture/Demo
August 18 - Annual Picnic & Auction - Rosade Bonsai Studio

February Meeting

February's program left no doubt in the minds of the audience that our guest speaker, Sharee Solow, was inspired by the beauty of Japan during her time there. Her photos of landscaped areas, sometimes as small as tiny gardens next to entrances of homes, or as large as the walkways of public or temple areas showed how the Japanese value nature. While there studying Japanese gardening techniques, Sharee made the most of her time observing and photographing the country. She commented that sometimes it seemed if the whole country is landscaped. The view from any window seems to be a planned composition. No view is left to random chance.
The second half of Sharee's program focused on bonsai or "pots" as Sharee called them. In her travels she was able to see and photograph bonsai in the yards of her neighbors and in bonsai nurseries. Her photos impressed us all and created a bit of envy for those of us who have yet to visit Japan. Thank you Sharee, for sharing your photos and comments with us.
Winner of the MidAtlantic raffle was Allen Slye - Congratulations!!

Flower Show 2013

Our 2013 exhibit for the Philadelphia Flower Show "Brilliant", while smaller than in previous years, presented itself very well. We had a few minor issues with seating for sitters, but all in all, traffic patterns were much better, visibility was improved, both by having all tokanomas facing center, and by colorful aprons worn by our sitters.
The number of bonsai displayed was fewer this year in part due to lack of members to show trees, and we certainly hope that our show chairman, Randy Naftal, has an easier time finding members willing to exhibit in the future. Keep working on those trees so you, too can exhibit next year!
No amount of thanks can do justice to the hours and hours put in by our exhibit sitters. Their willingness to help is invaluable!
Speaking of invaluable, our show chairman, Randy Naftal, puts in countless hours working with PHS to ensure our exhibit receives their best efforts, organizing setup and teardown, and checking daily on the exhibit. Many thanks from all of us, Randy!

President's Notes

The 2013 Flower Show is over and although newspaper articles claim that it was not very successful
as far as attendance goes, it was a success for PBS. Our exhibit was much improved. Members were able to speak with the public in a more protected setting, not in the stream of traffic. The exhibit was visible to sitters at all times without constantly walking in circles.
Thank you to Exhibit Chairman, Randy Naftal. He attends the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society meetings and planning sessions for us. After supervising set up, he visits the exhibit daily to ensure that things are going smoothly and attempts to fix each problem that arises. Working with PHS, the unions and the public is not much fun at times.
Thank you to those who exhibited trees - Randy Naftal, Jim Brant, Patrick McCole, Andrew Klein, Karen Harkaway, Chase Rosade, Solita Rosade, Paul Krasner, Howard McNeal, and Allen Slye. They also assisted in set up and tear down.
Thank you to our sitters, too numerous to list. They provide valuable service to our exhibit by providing information to the public while caring for the trees.
PBS will have a presence at the Japanese Cherry Blossom Festival at Morris Arboretum on Saturday, April 13. We will have several trees on display and will hand out brochures to encourage membership. Several members are helping me there on that day.
Our next meeting occurs after MidAtlantic, so I hope to see you first at MidAtlantic and then on the 26th of April at our April meeting. .
Linda

MidAtlantic Festival

This month's MABS focus is on Ryan Neil from the US. Growing up on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains near Aspen Colorado, Ryan was inspired by the rustic, wild trees growing in the mountains. The trees maintained a place in his imagination, leading him to begin bonsai study with Harold Sasaki in 1995. After graduating from college in 2004, he spent six years as an apprentice for Masahiko Kimura in Saitama Prefecture, Japan, climbing up the ladder from the basics of watering to the point where he worked on Kimura’s most famous trees and helped to prepare for the annual Kokufu-ten exhibition in Tokyo. He returned to the US in 2010, opening his own studio, International Bonsai Mira, in Oregon, where he teaches bonsai and specializes in working on collected western trees, especially Rocky Mountain Junipers. He has traveled widely in the US and Europe, enticing bonsai aficionados with his detailed teaching of the finer points of bonsai along with his daring feats of branch bending. MABS is delighted to have Ryan join us for MABS 2013. On Friday afternoon, he will conduct a workshop using collected American Larch. With lecture/demonstrations on Friday evening and on Saturday, he will work on a wonderful Pitch Pine and on a collected Rocky Mountain Juniper, giving him the opportunity to communicate his understanding of the training techniques he uses to turn RMJ’s into fine bonsai. Please mark your calendars and make plans to attend the 2013 MABS Festival, April 19-21, 2013 at Grantville, PA. It's a great weekend of bonsai learning and fellowship.
Don't forget, your participation in the MidAtlantic Festival directly benefits both you and PBS. Also, if you are a first-time attendee, full regsitration cost is cut in half!!

National Bonsai Foundation

When PBS traveled to the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in Washington last May, first time (and repeat) visitors were absolutely wowed by the setting and the displays of the three bonsai collections , Japanese, Chinese, and American.
Visitors may have noticed the deterioration of quite a few elements of the Japanese pavilion. Stuccoed walls were peeling in some spots, benches starting to look long in the tooth, carpenter bees flying all over, and a general lack of ideal temperature conditions, especially on hot Washington days.
The time has come to remedy the problems, but that can't be done without substantial funds. Since last summer the "Campaign for the Japanese Pavilion: A Gift Renewed" has been actively soliciting donations for the renewal of the Japanese Pavilion. One anonymous donor has pledged over one-half of the estimated cost of that task - others have given in hopes of reaching the campaign goal of two million dollars. The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society has pledged to help -you'll find PBS is "On the List".
Please consider adding your name to the list by pledging to this most deserving campaign.
Follow the link (shown on the right) on the PBS web site, make a donation, and watch for your name to appear.

Seasonal Notes

We're almost there!! Working on our trees, repotting, wiring, fertilizing, watering, and so much more --but wait!
Keep an eye on each night's weather forecast. Freezing wether is still possible.
Trees that have been repotted need to be protected from a freeze. Trees with buds just opening also need protection. We jokingly call this time of year "the bonsai shuffle" - bringing trees from afternoon sun back into shelter for the evening. Not a lot of fun, but necessary. Later on just covering the trees to protect from frost is sufficient.
For trees still in winter storage, be especially aware of soil conditions. Most bonsai stored outside are now pretty well thawed out. Low humidity and drying winds can cause them to dry out rapidly. If your soil mix drains well (as it should) be sure to water well.
Trees still in indoor storage will be pushing new growth very soon, if not already. These are bonsai eligible for the "shuffle". Be careful of sunburn on very tender leaves. Keep an eye on moisture.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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May 2013

May Meeting

This May Ted Matson returns as our featured artist. Ted's last visit was in May of 2005, so his return is long overdue. Ted is widely respected in the bonsai world as a gifted teacher and artist.
Ted began studying bonsai in 1979 in San Francisco, where he learned the basics under John Boyce. He moved to Los Angeles in 1980, where he became involved in a number of clubs and began a serious pursuit of the art, taking class from leading masters in Southern California, including Ben Suzuki, Shig and Roy Nagatoshi, Melba Tucker, Warren Hill and John Naka.
Ted started offering classes at his home in Pasadena in 1988. An in-demand demonstrator, Ted has conducted numerous programs (as well as workshops) at several bonsai conventions and conferences, and has been appearing more as a headliner/ featured artist for major bonsai events.
Although Ted is a lover of shohin bonsai, his collection includes trees of all sizes, styles and a range of species. They are known for their proportion, refinement and detail. Perhaps most notable of his bonsai is a 7-tree Foemina juniper grove on a granite slab that was selected for photographic display in the 1999 JAL World Bonsai Contest. The tree was featured in an article in the Bonsai Shunju, the official publication of the Nippon Bonsai Association.
Ted says one of his strengths is having a good eye for selecting material. A primary goal in his lectures and demonstrations is to help others improve their own abilities to recognize potential bonsai stock. And, he works to help people understand how to realize that potential through creative design and proper styling techniques. When not doing bonsai, Ted is a freelance writer.

Guest Speaker: Ted Matson -Lecture/Demo
Date: Friday, May 17
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7 pm

PS - Double your raffle chances - display a bonsai!
Demo material will be raffled.

April Meeting

We had a great turnout for our BYO workshop. Lots of trees of all levels of development, lots of ideas, and lots of assistance with pruning and wiring.

A special guest for the workshop was our "honorary member". Ofer Grunwald, visiting from Israel, where he is curator of the bonsai collection at the Jerusalem Botanical Gardens. He plans on returning in August to contine refining his juniper shown above.

MidAtlantic Festival

Attendance at this year's MidAtlantic Bonsai Festival was near a record high, especially for PBS members. The lecture/demonstrations given by the three featured artists, Minoru Akiyama, Peter Warren, and Ryan Neal, were outstanding, with great styling ideas and lots of useful information.
The bonsai exhibits were both very well done, and special congratulations go to Karen Harkaway who garnered two of the four awards for her juniper. Our other two members who exhibited, Patrick McCole and Allen Slye, while not winning awards, still presented quality trees. Thanks to all three for exhibiting their bonsai - PBS was well represented.
Shoppers kept the vendors busy all weekend because there were lots of great selections of merchandise.
The ikebana display in the lobby was a new addition for this year's Festival, and was very well received.
Both the silent auctions and the live banquet auction went very well, with lots of bidding action.
PBS had a lot of capable help with both auctions, and special thanks go to those people who made things go so smoothly - Mike Wiggington and Patrick McCole as runners and spotters, Linda Brant, Karen Harkaway, and John Berna who did a great job keeping records of the transactions.
No auction can be a success without great auctioneers, and Jim Doyle and Jim Gillespie kept things moving with skill and humor.
Many thanks to all who made the weekend a success!!

President's Notes

PBS was well represented at MidAtlantic this year. I hope that all PBS attendees learned a lot and had a good time. The demos were very informative and the exhibits were great. The professional exhibit (chaired by our own Jim Gillespie) was outstanding. Thank you to all who exhibited bonsai, helped out in the exhibit rooms, and helped at the auction. The two "Jims (Gillespie and Doyle) did a great job with the auctioneering. The auctions, both silent and live, were very successful.
The April 26th BYOB workshop was also well attended. Many members worked on trees with the help of some of more experienced members and there was some nice material being developed. Our honorary member from Israel, Ofer Grunwuld, was present, working on a juniper that he purchased. Several members watched as he prepared the juniper with raffia and did an initial wiring. He will be back in August to attend his sister's wedding and plans on doing further work on the tree at that time. The tree is living at the Brant's until Ofer's return.
As details of Ted's Matson's May visit were worked out, it became clear that PBS would have Ted for the whole day on May 17. At the meeting I took an informal poll as to interest in an afternoon workshop. Enough members signed up to pay for the workshop, so it will be held in the afternoon. Ted will demo at the meeting that evening. He is an experienced bonsai artist and an excellent teacher, so I hope that many of you come out to see him.
Congrats to Karen Harkaway who won two awards at MidAtlantic this year. Her bonsai certainly reflect her dedication and study.

Linda

Future Meetings

June 21 - Robert Mahler -Lecture/Demo
August 18 - Annual Picnic & Auction - Rosade Bonsai Studio

Dues Reminder

It’s that time of the year again! Our membership year ends with the last day of May. If your address label has an 12/13 on it, please send your dues check to our treasurer, David Spirt, as soon as possible, or rejoin at the May meeting. Labels displaying an 13/14 indicate dues are paid for the 2013-14 year. If you receive your newsletter via email, a notice will be sent. Dues remain at $30.00. Please clip the attached form, fill out, and return. The mailing address is:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society
Box 801
Spring House, PA 19477

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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June 2013

June Meeting

Our first program of our 50th anniversary celebration will welcome back Bob Mahler, returning for his fourth appearance.
Bob apprenticed under Chase Rosade of Rosade Bonsai Studios in New Hope, Pennsylvania from 1985-1989. In 1989 he left for Japan to study privately with world renowned bonsai master Susumu Sudo in Tochigi-Ken Japan. He returned to the states in 1993. In 1994 he became the curator of bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn NY. He left Brooklyn in November 2005 to pursue a lifelong dream of working with individual collectors via lectures, classes, private collection maintenance, and tours abroad. Bob was a contributing technical editor to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden's esteemed Gardener's Desk Reference. He also collaborated with the BBG on Growing Bonsai Indoors. Martha recently gave Bob a shout via the September 2012 issue of Martha Stewart Living Magazine. Bob's personal bonsai favorites are Japanese White Pines, Satsuki Azaleas, and Japanese Flowering Apricots. Bob resides in the Philadelphia area with his wife Jess and their dogs.
Bob's demonstration material for the evening will be a juniper. We look forward to a great program, with lots of great information from Bob. Be sure to attend.


Guest Speaker: Bob Mahler -Lecture/Demo
Date: Friday, June 21
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7 pm

PS - Double your raffle chances - display a bonsai!
Demo material will be raffled.

Future Meetings

August 18 - Annual Picnic & Auction - Rosade Bonsai Studio

May Meeting

Our guest artist for May, Ted Matson, spent the evening working on a spruce, and giving our members lots of information on styling of bonsai.
Ted stress five major points for consideration when creating or evaluating a bonsai - they are:

1. Movement
Rarely is a tree in bonsai absolutely straight. Some movement in the trunk is necessary except in the formal style.

2. Taper
Cylindrical trunks are not desirable in bonsai. A gradual progression from thick to thin is what a stylist should aim toward. Also that same progression of thick to thin should be exhibited in the branch structure.

3. Segmentation
This refers to the development of the components of the overall tree - the relationship of the each main branch to the other main branches. Each growing season or “event” a segment is created.  They are marked by internodes or sharp angles.  It can include segments on the trunk or branches.

4. Compression
Branch segments get shorter as they extend outward and trunk segments get shorter as they curve upward

5. Ramification
This progression of branching from primary to secondary to tertiary says to the observer that the tree is well aged, not a young tree. Ramification also has the effect of distributing the tree's energy more widely, affecting smaller foliage growth.

An example of the process would be the space between the nebari and first branch.  This is a segment and we would expect movement after this.  This space also determines the segment lengths for the rest of the tree.
Ted certainly demonstrated his skills as both stylist and teacher - a wealth of information was given and the beginnings of a great bonsai emerged from Ted's demo. Many thanks to Ted for a great program!

Be sure to check Ted's videos at:
www.tedmatson.info/

Seasonal Notes

This is a great time of year for bonsai growers!! The azaleas are in bloom, the deciduous trees are pushing out new growth, and the conifers' candles are sprouting. We can stand back for a moment and admire Nature at it's finest, but only for a moment. We have much work to do in the following weeks.....trimming deciduous growth, removing spent azalea flowers, and candle pruning on the pines. It’s also time to think about fertilizing, insect and disease control. Once temperatures are in the sixties, your trees can take in the nourishment you provide. Organics seem to be preferred more and more by our guest lecturers. Some choices are fertilizer cakes, OOF (Odorless Organic Fertilizer), fish emulsion, liquid kelp, and liquid seaweed. All of these do a good job of providing a slow, steady rate of feeding. Chemical fertilizers such as Miracle-Gro, Miracid, Peter's, and others are also beneficial, as long as precautions are taken not to cause fertilizer burn. Half strength dilution is the way to go. Additional supplements - SUPERthrive, Pro-TeKt, micro nutrient solutions, mycorrhiza, chelated iron, and others can be helpful solving particular health problems in bonsai or maintaining a healthy state.
Insect control can be problematic - we want the beneficial insects to stay with us while eliminating those who are destructive. Many growers say to do nothing until you see a problem, thus avoiding too much insecticide in the environment. Use of the correct product is important i.e.. Spider mites are not insects, they are arachnids, and don't respond to some insecticides - a miticide is needed to control the little critters. Oftentimes a strong spray of water is all that is needed to rid a tree of insect pests.
Regular spraying for fungus problems becomes necessary as the humidity and temperatures climb. Cedar apple rust is of special concern if you have juniper, apple, or hawthorn bonsai.

President's Notes

The June meeting will bring Bob Mahler as speaker and he will work on a juniper. Bob is very knowledgeable, having run his own bonsai business for many years. He studied in Japan and was the curator of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden's bonsai collection. Currently, he also maintains several private collections. Bob first spoke to PBS in March of 1992. I believe that he was the teen age student of Chase Rosade at that time, so he goes back a long way with PBS. Don't miss this meeting.
The annual PBS picnic will be held in August at the Rosades. Details will be sent out in a later newsletter. Please start to put aside material for the auction. Again it will be a 20/80% picnic. 20% will go to the donor and 80% to PBS. This is our main fundraiser so please be generous in your donations.
I was seriously delinquent at our May meeting when I did not mention that the 50 anniversary of the founding of the Pennsylvania Bonsai Society was on May 3rd. PBS is one of the oldest clubs in America, older that ABS or BCI. The purposes of the Society (as listed on the website) are:

To promote interest and enjoyment of bonsai,
To make bonsai information available,
To promote the collection and exhibition of bonsai,
To provide interaction between bonsai fanciers.

I feel that even after 50 years that PBS does an outstanding job in meeting these purposes. PBS will celebrate this special anniversary during the 2013-2014 year. Plans are being made for a dinner meeting to take place in October. Special 50th anniversary pots are being created for this event, so stay tuned. If anyone has information about the society especially in the years prior to 1990, please let me know. We are trying to put together a program for the dinner meeting.
It is time to pay your dues, so please pay at the June meeting or send a check if you have not already done so.

Linda

Dues Reminder

It’s that time of the year again! Our membership year ends with the last day of May. If your address label has an 12/13 on it, please send your dues check to our treasurer, David Spirt, as soon as possible, or rejoin at the June meeting. Labels displaying an 13/14 indicate dues are paid for the 2013-14 year. If you receive your newsletter via email, a notice will be sent. Dues remain at $30.00. Please clip the attached form, fill out, and return. The mailing address is:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society
Box 801
Spring House, PA 19477

Directions to the Greater Plymouth
Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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July/August

Annual Picnic and Auction

It's that time of the year!! Time for the annual picnic and auction. The August date was a success last year, so we're continuing in August again this year. This is a great opportunity to relax and chat about bonsai, have some great food, and participate in a spirited auction in a beautiful setting.

Previous Summer auctions have been conducted on a purely donation basis. While we still encourage donations, members have the option of receiving their share of a 20 -80 split - 20% to the seller, 80% to PBS (our Fall auction utilizes a 80-20 split -80% to the seller).
PBS will provide burgers, hot dogs, rolls, condiments, and beverages for the picnic. Members are requested to bring a covered dish (hot or cold), appetizer, or dessert to share.

Once everyone has eaten their fill, our annual auction will be held. Items will be sold to the highest bidder at no reserve. Finished bonsai, prebonsai, nursery stock, pots, tools, books, magazines, or any other bonsai related items are requested from members to help make our 2013-14 programs a success. Bidders are needed, too, so bring your checkbook or cash. The rule of the day is to take home more than you brought!!

There will be a special door prize, a drawing for a Gift Certificate from Rosade Bonsai Studio.

Please join us and share a great day. Take some time to stroll though Chase and Soli's bonsai collections- you won't find too many that are displayed as well or as well done. Come rain or shine -we'll have a shelter, just in case. Be sure to bring a lawn chair along with your items for the auction!!

Annual Picnic and Auction
Date: Sunday, August 18, 2013
Location: Rosade Bonsai Studio (directions on the last page)
Time(s):
Picnic - 1:00
Auction 2:00

June Meeting

June's meeting featured our good friend Bob Mahler, who gave an outstanding program, especially considering the circumstances. When we arrived at the Community Center, we learned that for some reason, the center did not have a room booked for us, and none were available. We discovered that the picnic pavilion was available, so we all trekked around the building and up the hill for an alfresco meeting. With the members seated at picnic tables, Bob began his demonstration.

A shohin juniper, a work in progress, served as an example of Bob's goal for the program, taking a thick-trunked juniper, bringing the branches in tight to that trunk, and ending up with a compact shohin.

Working from the world's most unique work stand, an inverted trash barrel, Bob identified those branches essential for his design, and removed the others. Wiring the remaining branches, then bending them to shape finished the process, and a truly great shohin emerged.
Bob gave us lots of information, as well as a lot of inspiration for working with junipers.

As darkness began to settle in, Bob drew the raffle winner, "Mr. Lucky", Jesse Cook, who took a beautiful future exhibit tree home.

Thanks Bob for a great program!!

President's Notes

In 1965 yearly dues for the Pennsylvania Bonsai Society were $5. The society met quarterly and had already staged 4 exhibits at the headquarters of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 536 people attended the 1965 exhibit (482 paid admission) and there were four commercial vendors.

I am getting a kick out of reading old PBS newsletters. These will be displayed at the 50th anniversary dinner in October. Please mark your calendar for Thursday, October 17th for this special event. The dinner will be held on a Thursday to hold down costs and hopefully to avoid some of the traffic on the turnpike that always occurs on Friday evenings. Special favors will be given to attendees and there will be a raffle for some special pots. Please plan to attend Further information will be announced at the August picnic and September meeting.

This year's picnic is being held at Rosade Bonsai Studio. Anne Boyd Jabloner has donated pots for the auction. These belonged to her late husband, Hal Jabloner, long-time member of PBS. Hopefully, you are looking through your bonsai and related materials for things to donate to the auction. Starting last year the auction became a 20/80% split - 20% to the donor and 80% to PBS. Those percentages will be reversed in November at the Members' Auction. The August auction is the main fund raiser for PBS.

Many of you are extremely helpful at PBS meetings and events and it is greatly appreciated. Think about becoming more involved by being on the Executive Board. This board meets 3 to 4 times a year to plan meetings, exhibits and other PBS events. It is a time commitment and we ask that you seriously consider that fact before you volunteer. Board members should be able to attend most monthly meetings, the picnic and the board meetings. Speak to one of the current board members (names listed on front of this newsletter) if you are interested.

See you at the picnic. We are not planning another windstorm like last year!

Linda

MidAtlantic Festival

The bonsai artists for MidAtlantic's 2014 Spring Festival are signed and rarin' to go. This year's featured artists are Takashi Iura from Japan, Corin Tomlinson from England, and Suthin Sukosolvisit from the US. Each artist has demonstrated great designs and extensive knowledge that they will be sharing over the weekend.

Friday Workshops, Members' Bonsai Exhibit, Lecture Demonstrations, Raffles, Silent Auctions, Banquet and Live Auction, Critiques, and a large vendor area are all part of the weekend. Reduced registration rates for first-time attendees remains in effect.

The venue for MABS has changed for 2014. The festival will be held at the Ramada Hotel in East Hanover, New Jersey. MABS was held at this facility from 1998-2007, an easy drive from our area.

Dates for the Festival are April 25-27, 2014.

Be sure to reserve this date - should be a super weekend!

Seasonal Notes

This summer has been a trying time so far for our bonsai. We've had several long stretches of 90º + heat with accompanying high humidity which has caused a good deal of stress in our trees.

We have been very concerned about our larches, as they like full sun, but not high heat, so we've been watering early in the morning, then trying to cool the pots off during the hotter afternoons. Some people shade the pots in an attempt to keep them cool, while others like Linda and me, spray water on the pots several times to cool them. Roots will withdraw or die back from a pot that's too hot.

Maples have been another concern. The Japanese maples are beginning to show signs of leaf burn. Our maples are in open shade, but get some direct sun for several hours. The only way to prevent leaf burn would be to provide more shade. Howard McNeal has gone so far as to erect a shade house for his maples. His maples do look much better without the leaf burn.

There is a theory often stated that water on maple leaves beads up and focuses the sunlight causing leaf burn. This falls in the category of urban legends or wive's tales - there is no truth to water on leaves causing leaf burn.

There are two possible causes of leaf burn; too much direct afternoon sun, or fertilizer burn. The latter can be very detrimental to a bonsai, so most bonsaists recommend use of organic fertilizers during these hotter months.

Our trees aren't showing a lot of growth right now, but will begin pushing again in a few weeks. Now is a great time to check for wire cutting into branches, make plans for fall pruning, check for insect damage, and double check that drainage is good in each pot. If you've made any air layers, check for root development.

Cooler days and nights are on the way! Keep your trees healthy and happy!

Dues Reminder


It’s that time of the year again! Our membership year ends with the last day of May. If your address label has an 12/13 on it, please send your dues check to our treasurer, David Spirt, as soon as possible, or rejoin at the Picnic. Labels displaying an 13/14 indicate dues are paid for the 2013-14 year. If you receive your newsletter via email, a notice will be sent shortly. Dues remain at $30.00. Please clip the attached form, fill out, and return. The mailing address is:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society
Box 801
Spring House, PA 19477

PBS dues are among the lowest in the region, with some exceptional member benefits.

Directions to Rosade Bonsai Studio

Central New Jersey - route 95 west to Rt 29 north to Lambertville, left on Rt 179 at light, cross bridge to New Hope. Turn right at first light Rt 32 north. Go 2 1/2 miles on Rt 32 to Ely Rd, turn Left on Ely for 1 mile - studio on left (sign) at end of long driveway

Philadelphia & South - Delaware, Maryland, D.C. etc - I 95 north to last exit in Pennsylvania # 51- left at stop sign. Follow signs and Rt 32 North for 10 miles into New Hope. From traffic light in center of New Hope continue straight (North on Rt 32 ) for 2 1/2 miles to Ely Rd on Left, 1 mile on Ely Rd to studio on left (sign)

Philadelphia & West - Pennsylvania Turnpike East to exit # 27 (Willow Grove) North on Rt 611 approximately 10 miles just south of Doylestown . Exit right to New Hope Rt 202 North. Follow Rt 202 North to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn left North on 32 about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. Studio on left at the end of a long driveway.

Allentown and North - take the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike south to Quakertown exit #32. Go north toward Quakertown on Rt 663 (which becomes Rt 313 East) through Crosskeys to Rt 202 north. Follow Rt 202 north to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn North on 32 to about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. Studio on left at the end of a long driveway.

For those with GPS, the address is:
6912 Ely Rd. -Solebury
New Hope, Pa 18938

215-862-5925


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September 2013

September Meeting

Where has the summer gone? It seems to have flown by once again!
September brings us to our first program of the 2013-2014 meeting year, and we're starting out with a lecture/demonstration by Pauline Muth.
She is the proprietor of PFM Bonsai Studio located in West Charlton, NY. Pauline is a Past President of the American Bonsai Society and has served as Recording Secretary and Executive Director for Bonsai Clubs International. She is currently President of MidAtlantic Bonsai Societies. Pauline has appeared at many conventions, both in the US and abroad. She has been actively involved in bonsai for over thirty years, a member of her original club (Mohawk Hudson Bonsai Society in the capital district area of New York State) for over 25 years where she now serves on the board of directors, and she has studied with some of the greatest masters in bonsai, such as John Naka, over the years.
Pauline's focus for the evening will be on material that is often ignored by bonsai enthusiasts, that of Eastern White Cedar (Thuja occidentalis) or arborvitae.
Pauline's demo material will be raffled off, so double your chances by exhibiting one of your bonsai at the meeting.

Guest Speaker: Pauline Muth - Lecture/Demo
Date: Friday, September 20
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7:00

There will be a follow-up workshop on Saturday, September 21.
Details on separate sheet. Space is limited!

Future Meetings

October 17 (Thursday) - Celebrate the 50th - Talamore Country Club
November 15 - Members' Auction
December 13 - Holiday Social & Raffle

President's Notes

I would like to thank the Rosades for hosting this year’s PBS picnic. Although it would have been nice to see more of you at the picnic the auction did very well. As many of you know the summer auction is the most important fundraiser for PBS as the money raised helps fund our yearly activities.
In two weeks, September 12 through the 15th, many of us will be making the trip to Saratoga, NY for the ABS Learning Seminar, which features various learning topics of bonsai. In the spring many of us will also be attending the Mid-Atlantic Bonsai Symposium, which features speakers from all around the world. I urge all of you to plan ahead and try to attend these events whenever possible, especially the MABS in April. There are many vendors available to buy all types of bonsai related items and the speakers are always excellent!
I look forward to seeing everyone in a couple of weeks as we resume our regular meetings with a visit from Pauline Muth. The topic will be very interesting as it will be featuring Eastern White Cedar; Pauline is also doing a workshop at the Brant’s house which will have plenty of nice trees to choose from. Please see the newsletter for details. Finally please take notice of the 50th Anniversary Banquet which will be held on Thursday, October 17, 2013 at The Talamore Country Club. As you can see we have a lot of great activities ahead this fall so mark your calendars now!
Mike

Annual Picnic and Auction

Perhaps due to the threat of rain (which never occured), attendance for this year's picnic and auction was no as great as in past years, but for those attending, it was a great opportunity to pick up some excellent material, bonsai points and other goodies as well as share some social time to discuss bonsai.
Our auctioneer, Jim Gillespie performed his usual excellent job, jokes aside, and kept things moving right along. Thanks, Jim, and thanks to all who donated to the auction. Over 125 items were offered for sale!!
Hosts Soli and Chase Rosade made everyone feel welcome. All were impressed by their bonsai garden. Thanks Chase & Soli for your hospitality!
Some great dishes brought to share helped to make a great buffet.
Final thanks go to our cooks for the day, Howard McNeal and Pat McCole. Hopefully, all that singed hair will grow back!

The following article does an excellent job of breaking down the varied aspects of bonsai that require our condsideration. I feel it is excellent "food for thought".....Ed.

General Aesthetic Guidelines for Bonsai

The following characteristics are desirable in many Japanese bonsai and other styles of container-grown trees, whatever the style:
Gravitas - This is the trait which all of the remaining points of aesthetics seek to create. It is a sense of physical weight, the illusion of mass, the appearance of maturity or advanced age, and the elusive quality of dignity. Many of the formal rules of bonsai help the grower create a tree that expresses wabi or sabi.
Miniaturization - By definition, a bonsai is a tree which is kept small enough to be container-grown while otherwise fostered to have a mature appearance. Bonsai can be classified according to size. Mame are ideally less than 10 cm (4 inches) tall and can be held in the palm of the hand. Shohin are about 25 cm (10 inches) tall, while other bonsai are larger and can not be easily moved. For both practical and aesthetic reasons, the guidelines outlined here are generally most effective and most often applied to larger bonsai, while the smallest specimens of bonsai may adhere to no rules other than "miniature tree" and "grown in a container".
Lignification - This refers to enhancing the “woodyness” of a bonsai’s trunk and branches so that they have a mature appearance. This typically means the bark surface is encouraged to become rough and dark-colored. In some cases this aesthetic technique will vary, as in a birch tree bonsai attaining the white color and exfoliating bark of a mature specimen.
Asymmetry - Bonsai aesthetics discourage strict symmetry in branch and root placement. Radial symmetry is nearly always broken by the requirement for a clear "front", which exposes the tree's trunk and major branches. The left, right, and back sides will have more branches than the front. Left-right (bilateral) symmetry across the trunk is also discouraged, and designers work to alternate branches among the left, right, and back parts of the tree without ever placing two branches at the same height or extending two branches the same distance away from the trunk.
Leaf reduction - Leaf reduction is related to the general miniaturization described above but is something which varies over the life cycle of a particular bonsai. For example, a bonsai’s leaves might be allowed to attain full size for many years in order to encourage vigor and growth of trunk, roots, and branches. It is usually desirable to attain a degree of leaf reduction prior to exhibiting a bonsai. Leaf reduction may be encouraged by pruning and is sometimes achieved by the total defoliation of a bonsai during one part of its growing season. Conifer needles are more difficult to reduce than other sorts of foliage.
Nebari - Also known as "buttressing", nebari is the visible spread of roots above the growing medium at the base of a bonsai. Nebari help a bonsai seem grounded and well-anchored and make it look mature, akin to a full-sized tree.
Ramification - The splitting of branches and twigs into smaller ones. It is encouraged by pruning and may be integrated with practices that promote leaf reduction.
Deadwood - Bonsai artists sometimes create or emphasize the appearance of dead wood on a bonsai tree, reflecting the occasional presence of dead branches or snags on full-sized trees. Two specific styles of deadwood are jin and shari. The presence of deadwood is not as common as most of the other points mentioned here, but can be used very effectively on selected tree species and bonsai styles. See deadwood techniques for more details.
Curvature - Trunk and branch curvature or contortion is an optional goal. Bonsai can achieve a sense of age while remaining straight and upright, but many bonsai rely upon curvature of the trunk to build the illusion of weight and age. Curvature of the trunk that occurs between the roots and the lowest branch is known as tachiagari. Branches are also curved and re-curved to help them fit the designer's requirement for "positive space", and to separate small branches so that they do not cross or collide.

Seasonal Notes

Many trees are emerging from their mid-summer slow-down, and are beginning to prepare themselves for the coming winter. When to Fertilize? This is the subject of some controversy. The conventional wisdom is to fertilize when the plants are in active growth. This generally is after bud break in the spring until late summer. The contention is that feeding well into the fall and early winter with nitrogen will force new growth that will be killed by frost. It now appears that this is a myth.
Plants begin setting buds in mid to late summer. Nitrogen does fuel new growth, but plays no role in initiating bud break. This is related to day length only. Cold hardiness acquisition is related to lowered temperatures and can actually be enhanced by regular fertilization with balanced levels of nitrogen. Based on these findings there is no reason not to continue balanced fertilizer feeding well into the fall and early winter. As long as the soil temperature is above about 55ºF plants will continue to absorb and store nitrogen as well as phosphorus and potassium. This storage of fertilizer by the plant plays a very important role in fueling new growth in the early spring when soil temperatures are cold and nitrogen is hard to acquire.
The conventional wisdom also says fertilizing with high levels of phosphorus in the fall will prepare the plant for winter by increasing its cold hardiness acquisition. There is no credible evidence to support this contention.
Nitrogen is the first number given on the label, (ex. 5-10-10). The second number refers to Phosphorus, which enhances root and cell tissue development and regulates flowering and fruiting. A fertilizer with a high Phosphorus number is desirable at this time of year. The third number refers to Potassium, which promotes circulation and production of sap, and promotes flowering and fruiting.
Three large numbers will usually be prominent on the front of the package. This is the NPK analysis. . Numbers such as 15-15-15, 20-20-20, or 18-6-12 are common. These numbers are the percentage by weight of the N-P-K , nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contained in the fertilizer. The more common fertilizers are 20-20-20, which should be diluted by 50% to avoid leaf burn. Harder to find are the 0-10-10 or 0-20-20 fertilizers best for this time of year.

MidAtlantic Festival

MidAtlantic is unique among bonsai organizations, in that convention proceeds, with the exception of seed money for upcoming conventions, are returned to member clubs. Pennsylvania Bonsai Society's participation in the 2013 MidAtlantic Spring Festival resulted in a fund-sharing check of over one thousand dollars which will be used to fund programs for the 2013-2014 meetings. Our participation helps not only PBS, but other member clubs of MidAtlantic. Speaking of member clubs, MidAtlantic has grown again, with the addition of the Bonsai Society of South Jersey as the newest member.
The upcoming Festival scheduled for April 25-27, 2014 returns to East Hanover, New Jersey, where the Festival was held from 1998-2007. Those of you who attended those festivals know that the hotel offered a great convention experience. If you haven't yet attended a MidAtlantic Festival, the first-time attendee discount is still in effect.
Speakers for this year's Festival are outstanding artists and experienced teachers of bonsai, so reserve the dates - April 25-27, 2014.

Upcoming Bonsai Events

September 13-15 - ABS Convention - "For the Love of Bonsai" - Holiday Inn - Saratoga Springs, NY

Through September 29 -Exhibit: "Becoming a Bonsai" -National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm (Fridays – Mondays only) -Washington, DC

October 12-13 - Bonsai Exhibit by the Bonsai Society of Lehigh Valley - Glenmar Nursery & Garden Center, 746 Copella Road, Bath, PA 18014

October 19 - Open House - Nature's Way Nursery - 1451 Pleasant Hill Road, Harrisburg PA

October 26 – November 10 - Exhibit: "Autumn Bonsai, Falling into Winter" -National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm (Fridays – Mondays only)


Be sure to become part of our
50th Anniversary celebration!!

Reserve your spot !!

A great dinner buffet, a short program, and (only for those attending) a special anniversary gift
compliments of PBS.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center


From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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October 2013

October Meeting

October's meeting will be our 50th Anniversary banquet. Hopefully your reservation is in place for the evening's festivities, since we had to have a commitment by the first of October. On display will be memorabilia from PBS's early years which will also be shown at future meetings. A slide program of the Flower Show exhibits of the 70's and early 80's will also be part of the evening's program.

September Meeting

Our new membership year began with a very informative program presented by Pauline Muth.
Pauline's introduction to her chosen material, Eastern White Cedar, was very comprehensive. One of her main points was that Eastern White Cedar (or arborvitae as it is commonly known) is an excellent candidate for bonsai, but care must be taken to find material unlike the landscape arborvitae we are all familiar with, having straight trunks and foliage far out on long branches. Collected material that has been exposed to ice and wind generally will have trunk movement and some character.
Following her discussion and with the arrival of the demo tree, some final branch placement took place, along with our usual raffle. Yours truly was the winner for the evening - boos and hisses didn't faze me!
Great tree - great evening! Many thanks, Pauline!
Pauline's program notes follow:

A Bonsai Close Up on Eastern White Cedar

Thuja occidentalis Eastern Arborvitae, American Arborvitae, Techny Arborvitae, Arborvitae, Northern White Cedar, or Eastern White Cedar

First of all, these are not cedars, they are Cypress. Thuja occidentalis, a species of thuja, is an evergreen coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae, native to the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada, from central Saskatchewan east to New Brunswick, and south to eastern Tennessee in the Appalachian Mountains so it is good material for a wide variety of climates. Although it can grown up to 20 feet tall and 8 feet wide but only with excellent cultivation. In the wild, the shrub’s size is kept in check by animals and climate damage which slow its growth and can produce beautiful twisted old wood. It is valued as a food by animals like rabbits and deer so protect it if you value your bonsai.
The eastern white cedar is most often associated with cool, moist, nutrient-rich sites, particularly on organic soils near streams or other drainage-ways, or on calcareous mineral soils. Mediums with a pH of 6.5-7 are ideal. A mixture of organics and bonsai medium works better than bonsai medium on its own. They exist in harsh and stressful environments. In their natural environment they can grow up to 15 meters in height. Growth in harsh conditions is slow. They require a winter freeze for health. In the heat of summer, protect them from harsh sun. Heat kills this species. Its natural life expectancy is 150-350 yrs. The scale like leaves can vary in color from yellowish green to dark green varying with the nutrients present in the soil. Regular use of an iron supplement will insure a dark green color. In cold weather, the color changes to a duller dark bronze color but brightens to its normal color in spring. It grows well in full sun but will tolerate some shade. When in a pot, you may need afternoon shade in hot weather. It has a wide horticultural range growing well from Zones 2 to 8.

Pruning:
Pruning cuts do not heal. Instead of cutting branches off, leave a jin.

Wiring:
Cedars are very particular when it comes to wiring the young fronds. There is no problems wiring branches, other than that old ones are very stiff and somewhat brittle. When wiring the foliage fronds, care has to be taken not to change the growing angle too drastically. The foliage tends to go in all directions, so you need to line up the foliage and create directionality but do this with the fronds that lend themselves to the direction you have in mind for your design. Each frond has a top and a bottom. Be sure to keep the tops up.

Bark:
If you remove living material to create jin or shari wait until spring and pull it away rather than scraping it off during other times of years. This will keep you from damaging the character of the wood under the cambium. As you develop the deadwood, be sure to follow the grain patterns inherent in the wood. Wire brushing is an excellent way to locate where to carve the wood as you follow the grain. Old dead bark is very difficult to remove. Work on it slowly when the bark is wet.
The exposed dead wood ages naturally to a nice white and is so resistant to rot making it ideal for jin and shari. The bark is a medium brown, with reddish under layers. As it ages, it peels off in strips. The wood is hard and very durable making it a good subject for creating deadwood. Some artists peel the old bark to give the bonsai the reddish bark since on old junipers but the peeled bark has a more aged effect as far as I am concerned.

Roots:
Root systems are often shallow and spreading allowing for fairly easy collection and growth in a pot. The collected root system may be one sided depending on the soil pockets available where it is collected. The tree will develop good root systems to even out with time. Remove circling roots which can develop in pot culture. Work to develop fibrous roots.

Foliage:
The leaves are opposite and scale-like, closely overlapping, successive pairs at right angles and growth upright in flat planes. Frequent pinching keeps small inter-nodal spaces. Leaves develop on new and old wood and often in dense bunches. After wiring the leaves must be placed right side up. Pinching needs to be done frequently to keep the leaves under control .Many people consider the foliage of cedars a problem. It takes concentrated effort to develop good foliage pads. Fronds will grow in every possible direction and take time to tame. Given time and effort, you can develop wonderful foliage pads.
Cedars grow throughout the growing season without a period of rest if conditions are appropriate, which they should be if they are being grown as bonsai. They therefore need to be pruned and pinched frequently. Lapses in your efforts will put the development of a good bonsai way behind schedule. Figure on two scissor prunings per season in the North and more in warmer areas. In between scissor prunings, you will need to hand pinch. Pinch back the ends of each frond by gently pulling the ends. Remove all growth that does not produce tight fronds...just long growths.
Back budding is difficult but will occur with good pruning techniques and exposure to light.
Cedars shed old foliage in fall. Some time in September or October, part of the foliage, usually in the interior of the tree, will turn rusty brown and slowly fall off. If you're not sure whether your tree is shedding or dying, pulling at the brown foliage is a reliable test, because the foliage about to be shed comes off easily, while the foliage about to die requires a lot of force to come off. Natural shedding can be reduced by timing one of the heavy pruning sessions to occur around the middle of August.

Pad development:
To develop fine foliage:
Remove or reduce buds in spring
Scissor cut the frond after first growth and for secondary growth (early August)
Pinch the remaining fronds back

Fruit:
Ripe cones are pale cinnamon brown, oblong, and 8 -13 mm (0.3 -0.5 in) long. Woody scales of mature female cones enclose double-winged seeds which are released the year after development.

Fertilizing:
Developing cedars use lots of fertilizer, feed weekly with a full strength chemical fertilizer beginning about the end of May and ending the middle of August, and another couple of applications in late September and early October. You may alternate between different products, including Miracid. Such fertilizing gives the trees dark green foliage and lots of growth, which, of course, is mostly pruned off, but does contribute to the denseness of the foliage pads. The use of a broad-spectrum fertilizer like Nutricote which is time released during developmental stages is also good. Supplement with iron monthly to insure a deep green color. Once the pads are fully developed

Pests:
Cedars are relatively free of pests. They can acquire scale and leaf miner, both controlled by spraying with a systemic insecticide. To prevent leaf miner spray a few times in spring. They tend to survive attacks.

Winter care:
As you would expect from a tree that is native northern regions of the American continent, cedars are very winter hardy. If your area is not prone to deer and other foliage eaters, the trees can be left out all winter. Be careful to protect bonsai with smaller root balls though.
Cedar foliage changes color in winter, becoming grayish-green with maroon undertones. To be sure that this is only winter color change check the underside of the foliage. It should still reveal a healthy light green shade and signal that all is well. The winter color disappears within a few days in spring

Future Meetings

November 15 - Members' Auction
December 13 - Holiday Social & Raffle
January 18 - Flower Show Workshop

President's Notes

October 2013

I don’t know about you but I found last month’s lecture on Eastern White Cedar to be very informative. I find it exciting to learn about a species I don’t know much about. I tend to think of the pencil straight landscape trees, not the fantastic specimens in Pauline’s presentation. Those of us who were fortunate enough to attend the ABS Learning Seminar in September saw several nice Eastern White Cedars including a demo by David Easterbrook. Over the last several years there has been a movement in bonsai to work more with native species and The United States has many great ones to choose from.
In a little less than two weeks we will celebrate our 50th anniversary! That is a tremendous accomplishment for any organization, especially one that is run totally by volunteers and donations. I hope you will enjoy the wonderful dinner and other activities that we have put together! I look forward to seeing you there.
One last note to remember that November is the member’s auction so look through your stuff and be ready to sell all those extra bonsai related items you have lying around.
Mike

The Auction is Coming!

One event many members look forward to is the fall Members' Auction. Don't forget to check for items you'd like to sell or to check for things you'd like to buy. Some very nice azaleas and boxwoods have already been donated, along with a good selection of pots by a most generous member.
What items can you bring for sale? Any bonsai related item - pots, books, bonsai, pre-bonsai, stands, scrolls, tools, wire, etc.
80% of the selling price of any item is returned to the seller, with 20% going to PBS.

MidAtlantic Festival

Don't forget to mark April 25-27 on your bonsai calendar for the 2014 MidAtlantic Spring Festival. This year a fantastic group of national and international artists will be showcased. Takashi Iura, from Japan, will headline this notable group, while from the United Kingdom, Corin Tomlinson, a second generation bonsai artist will demonstrate his bonsai skills, and from the United States, Suthin Sukosolvisit, who is very well known for his detailed masterpieces, will round out the slate of artists.
Each of our artists will be conducting Friday workshops utilizing some very nice material, as well as leading Saturday Critiques of the exhibit trees, along with giving lecture/demonstrations throughout the three-day event.
Every MidAtlantic Festival features bonsai raffles of the demonstration material, silent auctions all day Saturday, a banquet and live auction Saturday evening, and for many people the most important benefit, other than the bonsai artists, a large vending area with a wide selection of bonsai-related items for sale.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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November 2013 

November Meeting


One of the most anticipated PBS events is slated for November, that of the Members' Auction. Auctions in past years have provided members with a tremendous selection of plant materia;, bonsai, tools, pots, books, magazines and other bonsai-related items for purchase and the opportunity to put any of their items up for sale. Thanks to a generous donor, there will be a nice selection of pots and plant material (azaleas and boxwoods).
This is an opportunity to thin your collection, or to add some material to it for winter and early spring work. Bonsai, pots, prebonsai stock, tools, magazines, books, stands, or any bonsai-related item may be offered for auction. We look forward to a good turnout, both of sellers and buyers. Be sure not to miss this tremendous bonsai opportunity. Bring some things to sell and take home something you’ve bought - (balance is important!).
We’re also going to continue the Silent Auction this year with selected items being offered, placing your written bids on a list. Check the lists as the evening goes on and make sure that yours is the winning bid when the close of that auction is announced. Only items designated for silent auction may have a reserve (minimum) price. Silent Auction sales are subject to the 80-20 split between the seller and PBS. All items sold at regular auction will be sold without minimums.
PBS reserves the right to limit items based upon available time - we must be out of the building by 10pm. In order to auction this in the fairest possible manner, you’ll be asked to label each item both for accounting purposes as well as selling priority . For example, if you have five items, you would label each with a number and a letter (which will give your priority). When the auction starts, all items with an A letter will be auctioned first, then those labeled B, and so on. This way, each seller will have an equal exposure.
This is a great evening and loads of fun, so add to the enjoyment with your participation.

Members' Auction
Date: Friday, November 15
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time(s): (Check-in) - 7:00 - (Auction begins) - 7:30

October Meeting

When is a meeting not a meeting? When it's a 50th Anniversary celebration!!
PBS celebrated its 50th a bit late, as PBS was formed in May of 1963, but we made up for our lateness with a very special event.
Some of the historical material on display included our original charter, first newsletter, PBS logo contest entries, PBS president's roster, and a video of our 25th anniversary picnic. Slides of early PBS Flower Show exhibits showed how our staging and individual displays have changed through the years.
Following a great meal, we heard some comments and remembrances from our "senior" members, Chase Rosade and David Adler, both of whom have been active in PBS since its very early years. One last item of business for the evening was the awarding of Lifetime Memberships in acknowledgement of significant contributions through the years to David Adler and Jim Gillespie. 50th year commemorative accent pots created by Ron Andress were given to all who attended as souvenirs of the evening.
Lots of planning and effort went into this event with many thanks to Dave Spirt and Linda Brant for making this evening a roaring success. Here's to 50 more years!!

Editoral Ramblings

What a great feat for PBS! - 50 years, still vital, still growing, still providing bonsai information, and still contributing to the bonsai world. Meetings are friendly and informative, members are willing to share their knowledge and skills, others not embarrassed to ask questions or to get help.
In the early years, PBS members were instrumental in the formation of the American Bonsai Society. We owe those pioneers a debt of gratitude.

We often speak about collected trees, but rarely speak about collected moss. Yes, moss!! Just about the time an exhibit is coming up and we want to prepare our tree for that exhibit, we end up scrambling to find suitable moss.
If you have access to some "good" moss, gather it now and make it available at the January workshop, so those of us who never seem to have it on hand can prepare our trees more thoroughly.

The Flower Show is on the horizon - before wintering your trees, look for one of yours that's ready for exhibit in the Flower Show. Randy is always looking for exhibit trees - wouldn't it be wonderful if he had too many trees? Some nearby clubs even have competitions to get to exhibit trees!

Ed.

MidAtlantic Festival

2014 marks a change of venue for the upcoming MidAtlantic Bonsai Festival, returning to East Hanover, New Jersey, and the Ramada Hotel. Room rates have been discounted for the Festival. The Members' Exhibit will be located in a new area with more room for the displays than the former display rooms. The vending area is large and will be full of bonsai related sales items.
Workshops will again precede the rest of the weekend's activities being held on Friday afternoon. Friday evening will feature the first of the festival's demonstrations along with the hospitality suite.
Saturday is a busy day featuring lecture/demonstrations, the members' exhibit, silent auctions, bonsai raffles, bonsai critiques, a banquet, and ending with a live auction.
Sundays activities include more bonsai lecture demonstrations and raffles.
Be sure to mark April 25-27 on your bonsai calendar for the 2014 MidAtlantic Spring Festival. This year a fantastic group of national and international artists will be showcased. Takashi Iura, from Japan, will headline this notable group, while from the United Kingdom, Corin Tomlinson, a second generation bonsai artist will demonstrate his bonsai skills, and from the United States, Suthin Sukosolvisit, who is very well known for his detailed masterpieces, will round out the slate of artists.
This is a great bonsai weekend and a great value!

Future Meetings

December 13 - Holiday Social & Raffle
January 18 - Flower Show Workshop
February 21 -TBA

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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December 2013

December Meeting

This year our annual Holiday Social falls on Friday the 13th! This could be the very first time that people have looked forward to this date. Why? The annual Holiday Raffle, of course. We'll have a bunch of raffle surprises - pots, tools, wire, trees, whatever...- and lots of fun trying to separate the good items from the "zonks". There's even somewhat of a treasure hunt - which is trying to find the package containing the free MidAtlantic registration. That's right, one of the beautifully wrapped packages will contain a free, full registration to the 2014 MidAtlantic Bonsai Societies Festival, but be careful, packages can be deceiving. Thanks in advance to Chase and Soli Rosade for providing (and wrapping) all the raffle gifts.
This year's program will feature a presentation by Mike Wigginton, a short illustrated overview of The Kaikou School of Bonsai, which Mike is enrolled in.
Please bring a goodie to share with the group - cookies crackers, cheeses, dips, veggies, cakes, pies, or whatever. PBS will furnish soft drinks. Our Holiday Celebration is a wonderful tradition for all of our PBS members. Please join us and enjoy. We promise you’ll have a good time!

PBS Holiday Social
Date: Friday, December 13
Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center
Time: 7:00

Remember to bring any tree that you want to discuss prior to the start of meetings. Advice on styling, care, horticultural problems, pot selection, etc. can be obtained from other members before the start of the program.
No exhibit trees this month, please. We need room for all the gifts!!
(No double tickets this month.)

Future Meetings

January 18 - Flower Show Workshop
February 21 -Chase Rosade - Lecture- Bonsai Display
March 1-9 -Exhibit Sitting - Philadelphia Flower Show

November Meeting

This year's Members' Auction was a great success! Some very nice items were place on the auction block - pots, pre-bonsai, bonsai, Asian items, scrolls, etc. Gross receipts for the evening were in excess of $2300 with almost $300 coming from donations.
Speaking of donations, how great is it that a former PBS speaker, Young Choe, came to the meeting and donating a beautiful kusomono that she had created as well as a very nice pot for auction?!
This year's auction was also unique in that we witnessed the rise of a new auctioneering star, President Mike Wigginton. Reality TV stardom may be in his future! Thanks, Mike -great job!
Also, thanks to everyone who participated as buyers and sellers for making this a very successful auction, and to John McGowan, Andrew Klein, and John Berna for their assistance in keeping the action flowing.

Flower Show Notes

It’s not too early to begin thinking about the Philadelphia Flower Show, March 1-9, 2014. The theme for this year is "ARTiculture".
As always, we need trees for display. We’ve seen some great trees at each meeting these past years - how about submitting one of your trees for exhibit at the Flower Show? Contact our Flower Show Chairman, Randy Naftal at rnaftal@gmail.com or 484-432-5847 for specifics.
Linda Brant is always looking for volunteers, new or experienced, to help act as docents for the exhibit. A brief three hour period is all that is needed. Tickets to the Show are provided for you and a guest (have you checked the cost of admission this year? $30+!!!). We have to cover the exhibit for the entire show (101 hours!!), so lots of help is needed. Contact Linda by phone (610-948-6380) or email (lbrant@comcast.net) to volunteer, or sign up at our meetings.

President's Notes

Well I can’t believe another year is coming to an end! Hopefully everyone has their trees safely tucked away for winter. We had temperatures where we have seen a nearly 40 degree swing which makes it tough to water. Many of mine were frozen to the bench!
This month we will have our usual holiday party which is always a good time! Come out and take a chance at winning a free admission to MABS this coming April. Last month we had our annual members’ auction and to my surprise I got to be the auctioneer due to a schedule mix up with our usual guy! I would have liked to see more people come out there is always a bargain to be had and the more stuff sold the better PBS is able to bring in more speakers!
I would like to wish everyone happy holidays and a safe prosperous new year! See you at the meeting.
Mike

MidAtlantic Festival

While 2014 marks a change of venue for the upcoming MidAtlantic Bonsai Festival, the drive, for most members should be just about the same as it was to Grantville.
This month one of the scheduled speakers, Corin Tomlinson, from the UK, will be the subject of our focus.,
Some of our long-time members will remember Corin's father, Harry, who appeared at MABS in 1996. Harry has since retired and Corin and his brother Paul have taken over the nursery.
Here are Corin's comments;
"In my quest to learn bonsai I have been lucky enough to study and apprentice with some of the most respected bonsai artists in the world.
I consider bonsai to be made up of two parts, horticultural and artistic, and feel that one must have sufficient knowledge in both of these areas to achieve best results with Bonsai.
To achieve this goal, I first undertook a 3 year National Diploma in Horticulture at Merrist Wood College in Surrey, UK. This I complemented by extensive full time study mainly in the USA.
I spent the majority of my time over a 4 year period studying and teaching at The International Bonsai Arboretum in Rochester New York with Wm. N Valavanis. I spent time studying with Chase Rosade at his bonsai studio in New Hope, Pennsylvania, and was very lucky to be mentored by Yuji Yoshimura, the founder of Bonsai in the USA.
I have demonstrated widely at conventions and symposia throughout the USA and upon my return to England became curator of The National Bonsai Collection housed at The Royal Botanical Gardens in Birmingham.
Having studied bonsai for over 20 years, under some of the worlds best respected bonsai masters, such as Wm. N Valavanis, from the International Bonsai Arboretum in Rochester NY, Chase Rosade, from PA, Yuji Yoshimura and of course my father, Harry Tomlinson, I now spend a great deal of my time traveling around the country, demonstrating the skills and artistry that I have learnt.
Since Harry’s retirement in 2008 the business is now owned and run by Corin and his brother Paul, who are now building on 35 years of success and taking the nursery into a new era. Set in 12 acres of beautiful countryside, just one mile north of Nottingham, you will find the largest specialised Bonsai nursery in the UK, who can offer you unparalleled choice and knowledge on bonsai."
Mark the dates April 25 - 27, 2104 on your calendar.

Weather Related Meeting Notification

Over the years, we have had very few cancellations due to the weather, but sometimes we get caught in a storm. If we are faced with a cancellation, the following procedures will take place.
A. If you are on the email list for newsletters - you will receive cancellation notice by email.
B. If you are not on the email list, then check the web site. Cancellation notice will be posted prominently on the home page.
C. If you do not have computer access, a board member will attempt to contact you by phone.
D. We will also try to place a notice on KYW radio.
E. We will attempt to notify the Community Center.

If you are in doubt about a meeting taking place, be sure to check before leaving home.
The phone number of the community Center is (610) 277-4312.

Seasonal Notes

Now is the time when our bonsai are ready to go into winter storage. Linda and I usually spend the weekend after Thanksgiving getting the trees into the storage area. We're a little late this year and we've had a few very cold nights, so fingers are crossed. We split storage between an unheated garage and an outdoor bed. The outdoor bed is open to the sky, but sheltered on three sides. Trees stored outdoors are set on the ground and the pots covered with mulch.
Preparation for storage includes checking for embedded wire, removing weeds, brushing moss of roots and trunks, checking for insect damage or eggs, and a thorough watering.
There are a few things to keep in mind, no matter how you arrange your winter storage.
One, the wind is your worst enemy. Dessication occurs when the roots are frozen and water is evaporated from the branches or needles by the wind - the tree is likely a goner, so protection from the wind is a must.
Two, protection from the sun (for most trees) is ideal. Thawed branches and frozen roots are a poor combination. Dormant trees don't need light.
Three, you may have to water on occasion. The trees we store in the garage are watered about every week, unless the soil is frozen. We have to keep a close eye on moisture levels. The trees stored outdoors may need watering (soaking the covering mulch) once or twice over the winter. Snow cover is actually good to have, as the melt water provides moisture and the snow cover acts as insulation. We often will make snowballs to put on the trees stored in the garage as a slow watering system.
Lastly, be sure that critters won't be munching on your trees. Mouse traps or bait for indoor storage work well - just keep checking. Outdoors, we don't really have the ability to protect the trees 100%. We've used moth balls mixed into the mulch with some success against voles and field mice, but we've had deer lean over the enclosure and eat azalea buds. Irish setters work with some degree of success against the deer.

A PBS Welcome

Due to an oversight, we neglected to acknowledge and welcome our new members for the 2012-13 membership year, so we'll publish that welcome along with this year's new members. Welcome all!

Paula Bewley Rich Burke Paul Curtin
Michael Dean Dutchner Michael Horgan Susan & Joe Jacovino
Kyle Jones Tom Kinka Phyllis Kinser
Vicky Lu Linda Mingo Linda Ottaviano
Barbara Ray Wesley Rissell Leslie Stoner
Virginia Stubbleline Roddy Von Seldeneck

National Bonsai Foundation News

If you have traveled to Washington to visit the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, you know that we have one of the finest collections in the world virtually next door. The Museum could not survive without the help and support of bonsai enthusiasts in the United States.
The end of the year is nearly upon us, and with it , time is running out for those charitable donations for tax purposes. The National Bonsai Foundation is one excellent recipient for those donations. Please do your best to support the National Bonsai Foundation through a tax-deductible contribution and membership. Budget concerns have not disappeared, only temporarily slipped into the future. Your contribution and membership in NBF will help guarantee the Museum’s continuance. Basic membership is $35.00. You may join easily on the NBF web site: www.bonsai-nbf.org , or you may make your check payable to The National Bonsai Foundation, and mail to: The National Bonsai Foundation. 3501 New York Avenue N.E., Washington D.C. 20002

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center


From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)-Take Exit 333 (Norristown - old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Blue Route (I-476)-Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.
From Route 202-Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road.

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