PBS Newsletter

Archives

2007

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January 2007

January Meeting

The Philadelphia Flower Show is drawing near (March 4-11), time to really think about exhibiting a tree in the PBS exhibit. This month's workshop will provide members with an opportunity to learn exactly what is involved in preparing a tree for exhibit, evaluating exhibit quality of a bonsai, and the finer points of exhibit preparation. Our workshop is hosted by Howard McNeal, and as usual, members are encouraged to bring trees for evaluation or work. If you'd like some advice on a tree, or just the opportunity to assist in preparations, or you wish to exhibit your tree, this is the best time to do so. Please plan to join us in a creative and constructive day. Lunch will be provided.

 

Date: Saturday, January 20

Exhibit Workshop - Host: Howard McNeal

Location: Old Mill Bonsai Studio, 420 Lewis Mills Rd. , Honeybrook, PA

Time: 10am

 

Directions: See page 5

December Meeting

Our December meeting was a triple feature - Holiday Social, estate auction, and China travelogue. Our evening started with an spirited auction of bonsai and bonsai pots from the estate of Hal Jabloner which, due to November's cancelation , was carried over into December. We have become accustomed to the fine auctioneering skills of Jim Gillespie and he didn't fail to keep the auction moving, dispensing both great horticultural knowledge and some real corn (-y jokes).

The auction was followed by a presentation by the Brants, showing the wonderful penjing they experienced at the BCI convention last spring in China.

The social followed with tables full of goodies, and the holiday raffles. As usual, the search for the elusive MABS registration kept people looking intently at packages, trying to figure out which one contained it. Some great raffle gifts were opened and Dominick Haigh turned out to be the lucky winner of the MABS registration.

Our evening closed with part two of the China tour presented by Chase and Solita Rosade, showing more of the wonderful China tour and trees.

Thanks to all who brought goodies to share - the holiday season sure got off to a great start!!

Future Meetings

February 16 - Jim Hughes - Curator - National Bonsai & Penjing Museum

March 4 - 11 - Philadelphia Flower Show - PBS Exhibit

April 26** - Ted Matson - Lecture/ Demo

Flower Show Notes

From our Exhibit Chair, Randy Naftal:

Hello members,

I am looking for trees for this years Flower Show. We need 13 trees for the windows and a large tree for the center display. This years Flower Show theme is "The Legends of Ireland". Not that it has an influence on us, but I am using clover as an accent.

The workshop for all members is January 20th at Old Mill Bonsai hosted by Howard McNeal. Please bring a tree that you would like to work on and display at the show.

In addition, please bring the stand you want to use and a scroll so we can look at all the elements together and help you with the display. If you have any questions you can reach me on my cell 484 432-5847.

See on the 20th!

From Linda Brant:

As usual we need lots and lots of sitters for the PBS Flower Show Exhibit. There are still lots of openings available. You can sign up at any of the next two meetings, or call to arrange a day and time -610-948-6380.

Thoughts on Design

From the Bonsai Society of St. Louis Newsletter, Volume 4 No. 11, November 2006

 

What Front?

There has been a great deal of conversation lately, within the bonsai community on the topic of a tree's "front". Do trees in nature, the three-dimensional objects we so passionately try to emulate, actually have "fronts"? Is our goal in creating a piece of "living sculpture" to create a three-dimensional object and then enhance its key attributes or design features by displaying it from a single vantage point? Is the whole process of assigning a single angle of view to a three-dimensional object somewhat of an exercise in paradox?

 

In his article, The Myth of the Single Front, Will Heath defines, "... the front of a bonsai is the view looking at the bonsai about midway up the trunk, and at such an angle that the back rim of the pot is just barely visible. This is the precise angle that a show photograph is taken of the bonsai and as such it serves as the focal point around which the rest of the bonsai is styled."

 

Based on the previous definition, I feel my answer to each of the questions posed earlier is a definite yes.

Do trees in nature, the three-dimensional objects we so passionately try to emulate, actually have "fronts"? The knee-jerk response to this question is obviously, no. Trees don't have "fronts" (or backs, or sides) anymore than stones or plants or any other natural objects do. It is interesting, however, to think about how we choose to view a solitary tree in a meadow or a boulder on the beach. Due to forces unknown to us, we are compelled to circle the object of interest (or to turn it in our hand if it's small enough) until we discover a single view that encapsulates what we find interesting or appealing. We use this highly personal discovery process to locate and define that part of an object that contains the most meaning for us &endash; the object's "front".

Is our goal, in creating a piece of "living sculpture" to create a three-dimensional object and then enhance its key attributes or design features by displaying it from a single vantage point? I feel "... enhance its key attributes or design features" is the key here. When we designate a small portion of a bonsai as the front, we instill within it a purpose or meaning. We are in effect assigning this area of a bonsai "the responsibility" to enhance all the positive features of that particular tree and the species to which it belongs.

 

In many ways selecting a front for a bonsai employs the same logic as selecting a seat at a baseball game. Any spectator knows that he or she will be able to "see the game" regardless where they choose to sit in a stadium. However, if given the choice of a seat behind home plate or one in the "nose-bleed seats" in right field, most folks would choose to be located down near the field and close to the action. And the reasoning here is simple; sitting behind home plate provides a baseball fan the optimal range for viewing the variety of actions and activities underway. Sitting "close to the action" provides the viewer the opportunity to notice subtle details lost to the majority of fans at the game. It also provides the spectator a broad enough range of viewing to ensure the "game on the field" can be comprehended in its entirety.

 

When you create a bonsai you have several design elements, depending on the genus and species to consider. A crab apple (genus Malus) requires the bonsai designer to ponder the likelihood of spring flowers, disproportionately large leaves, and mid to late seasonal fruit. When you work on a juniper (genus Juniperus) it's a twisting trunk, tufts of foliage, and possible areas for jin and shari that require your attention. As Roy Nagatoshi stated in a recent demo hosted by our club, "All the key design elements of the tree should be visible from the front." Or in the terms of my viewing a baseball game metaphor, the challenge is to locate that section of the tree that allows the viewer the opportunity to get "close to the action" while not obstructing their "view of the entire field".

 

Is the whole process of assigning a single angle of view to a three-dimensional object somewhat of an exercise in paradox? I believe we as intelligent, creative beings are engaged in an ongoing process (consciously or unconsciously) to discover, highlight, and assign, value in the things we come into contact with. If provided the opportunity to travel to Florence, to view Michelangelo's masterpiece, David I have no doubt I would gaze at it in unbelievable awe. And, after recovering from the magnitude and shock of viewing such a beautiful object, I would walk around it slowly to absorb each and every curve and polished surface. That is what we do when confronted by objects of power, of beauty and of grace, like a beautiful sculpture or a bonsai masterpiece. We examine and embrace it. We seek to discover each and every detail, and we push ourselves to highlight its value, not in monetary terms, but in more personal measures of merit and esteem.

 

And where does this discovery process take place? It happens where the art object stops being a collection of fascinating, isolated parts, and becomes whole. It happens where we clearly see the sum of the parts, not a tree and pot any longer, but a single, distinct and solitary item. It happens when we stop to view a bonsai from the single best position ..., from its front. - Russ Marchant - 11/06

 

President's Notes

Happy New Year!

I hope this finds both you and your family in good health.

 

I welcome the New Year in with yet another day above normal temperature (71 deg.). I need to make sure my trees don't dry out, but I love this weather as long as it lasts.

 

I'm sitting here watching the Eagles pre-game show and waiting to see if their season will continue or end (They won, Mike! -Ed.). But no matter what the outcome, it's has been yet another season that keeps you on the edge of your seat.

 

What a great meeting we had in December, about 50 members, a good auction and auctioneer, good weather, and a fabulous travel log of Bonsai in China.

 

Our next meeting we will be at Howard McNeal's, at the Old Mill Bonsai Studio, Honeybrook, PA - (610) 942-2602. This meeting will be to work on your tree for the Philadelphia Flower Show. Look at your trees as you prepare them for winter storage. See Randy Naftal, our flower show coordinator about the trees which are needed for the show. Also, contact Linda Brant about sitting with our display at the Flower Show.

 

Happy Holidays

Mike Marinelli

Seasonal Notes

This year, 2007, seems to have started out with March weather, rather than that of January. As Mike stated in his President's Notes, we've seen temperatures up to the 70's. As of this writing, we have had almost forty consecutive days' temperatures above our normal temps - only three mornings in the 'teens. Along with the warmth, we have had more than our share of rain.

Here's a snippet from the Jan. 2006 newsletter:

We've just gone through one of the weirdest Decembers in memory. We've had early snow and very cold temperatures early in the month, and unseasonable warmth and rain late in the month. Here in Royersford, we've had at least 9 days of single digit lows, and one morning of 4º below zero. As I write this, the temperature is 51º with fairly heavy rain - go figure.

What effect will this 2007 warmth have on our bonsai in winter storage? Well, if you've kept in mind that the ideal location for bonsai trees in winter storage is in contact with the soil, you may not have as many worries as you thought. Soil temperatures tend to remain far more constant than air temperatures, so the roots may not have experienced the temperature fluctuations that can be so damaging to bonsai.

Any trees stored in an indoor location( garage, shed, etc.) may need some special attention. The warmer temperatures may start trees "pushing". Do whatever you can to lower the indoor temperatures - leave doors open at night or early morning, keep things closed up during the warmer parts of the day. Nighttime temperatures may be low enough to maintain dormancy.

As long as buds haven't begun to swell greatly, the trees should survive dips into the teens following a warm period - let's all keep our fingers crossed.

Seeing landscape trees and shrubs in bloom in January is very weird - it looks like the weather is going to become more normal later in the month, about the time of our Flower Show workshop.

MidAtlantic Festival

Your MABS registration form should have arrived - if you haven't received yours, be sure to give a yell. Be sure to sign up early, especially if you're interested in a critique or a workshop, also there is a discount for early registration.

This year three talented bonsai artists - Robert Steven from Indonesia, Guy Guidry from Louisiana, and Ted Matson from California will be presenting two lecture/demonstrations , as well as offering exhibit critiques and workshops.

Hotel rates remain the same as previous years, as does registration, making the MidAtlantic Festival a very reasonable weekend. Please join us at the MABS Spring Festival, April 20-22, 2007 for a great day or weekend of bonsai.

We still need three quality trees from PBS members to display in the MABS exhibit - if you are interested, contact Jim Brant or John Constantine for details. As in past years, awards are presented to outstanding trees.

Directions to the Exhibit Workshop at Old Mill Bonsai Studio

Take the PA Turnpike to the Downingtown Exit. Then take Rt. 100 south to Exton Square and Rt. 30 west. You can also take the Schuylkill expressway to Rt. 202 south to Rt. 30 west.

Next, take Rt. 322 out of Downingtown, cross over Rt. 82, then make a right on the next road. Go about 2 miles and cross over an iron bridge. At the next crossroad, make a right and go 3/10 mile to a Y in the road. House in on the right. Parking in the studio lot. Please phone Howard 610-942-2082, or Randy 484-432-5847. if you need further directions .

 

 

 

 

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February 2007

February Meeting

In the midst of our winter doldrums, we are most fortunate to have as our speaker Jim Hughes, curator of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, for the February meeting. Jim will be presenting a program describing the Museum, its projects and plans, as well as his role in maintaining the collection of American, Japanese , and Chinese bonsai. With over 150 specimen trees on display, and numerous others growing or recuperating behind the scenes, maintaining this collection in good health is an awesome responsibility, one that Jim has embraced.

Jim was appointed Curator of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum in November 2005. He is a native of Minnesota and a graduate of St. John's University in Collegeville, Minnesota with a degree in English and a minor in Education. He took up bonsai as a hobby while working as a high school teacher. In 1996 he moved to Washington D.C. and began volunteering at the Museum. He assumed the position of Assistant Curator for Plant Collections in 2002 and in 2005 he studied penjing and the origins of bonsai at the Shanghai Botanical Garden. He is an active member of the Brookside Bonsai Club of the Potomac Bonsai Association.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about an extremely valuable resource and source of inspiration that is only a few hours drive away. While many of us have visited the Museum, and we hope that this program will encourage those of you who haven't yet visited to view the collections in Washington and to become a supporter of the National Bonsai Foundation.

By the way, we'll have a special MABS registration raffle this month.

 

Speaker: Jim Hughes

Date: Friday, February 16

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time: 7:00

January Meeting

Weather forecasts held true and the real winter cold arrived just in time for our Flower Show Workshop at the Old Mill Bonsai Studio. The bitter cold and wind did not keep our members in their warm homes that Saturday morning, as we had a great turnout, lots of good trees, and a lot of advice and conversations about the trees. Howard McNeal went from tree to tree offering advice on improvements or exhibition suggestions. Pruning, trimming, and wiring were the order of the day, a great start for the PBS exhibit at the Flower Show. Thanks to all who participated in the workshop, with a special thanks to Howard, who was our host and mentor for the day.

Future Meetings

March 4 - 11 - Philadelphia Flower Show - PBS Exhibit

April 26** - Ted Matson - Lecture/ Demo

May 11 - Horst Kreckler - Lecture/Demo

 

Seasonal Notes

With the arrival of February, it's time to start actively working on our trees in anticipation of the arrival of Spring and a new growing season. Now is a great time to wire both conifers and deciduous trees. Keep the wire just a hair on the loose side to allow for the rapid spring growth which is coming. If your tree is deciduous, keep in mind that wire will need to be watched closely once the tree comes out of dormancy and begins to grow - wire can cut into a branch very quickly.

Repotting can also take place in February, with the important proviso that the root mass cannot be allowed to freeze following repotting. If you have a garage or shed where freezing will not occur, and temperatures can be held below 45 or 50, go ahead and begin repotting.

One thing I noticed this winter was that because I had neglected to remove a covering of moss on a few trees in garage storage, I had a much more difficult time watering these trees, as the moss repelled the water. One way around this, I found, was to spray the moss several times with water a few minutes before attempting to water the tree. A few minutes work in the late fall work have saved a lot of aggravation this winter.

MidAtlantic Festival

Please join us at the MABS Spring Festival, April 20-22, 2007 for a great day or weekend of bonsai. Registration fees have remained the same , making MABS a great value.

This year three talented bonsai artists - Robert Steven from Indonesia, Guy Guidry from Louisiana, and Ted Matson from California will be presenting two lecture/demonstrations , as well as offering exhibit critiques and workshops. One interesting aspect of this year's festival will be that each artist will work on similar material for one of their presentations. The different approaches to design should be very interesting.

Helpers and exhibitors are needed - if you're interested contact Jim Brant or John Constantine. Your participation helps PBS in maintaining its high caliber of programs.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) -Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476) - Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202 - Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

 

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March 2007

See April 2007 below

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March/April 2007

April Meeting

Our April meeting will feature a lecture demonstration by Californian Ted Matson. Ted began studying bonsai in 1979 in San Francisco, moved to Los Angeles in 1980, became involved in a number of clubs and began a serious pursuit of the art, taking class from leading masters in Southern California. Ted started offering classes at his home in Pasadena in 1988. An in-demand demonstrator, Ted has conducted numerous programs and has been appearing more as a featured artist for major bonsai events.

Ted last visited PBS in 2005, and was very well received. A primary goal in his lectures and demonstrations is to help others improve their own abilities to recognize potential bonsai stock. And, he works to help people understand how to realize that potential through creative design and proper styling techniques.

Although Ted is a lover of shohin bonsai, his collection includes trees of all sizes. Ted says one of his strengths is having a good eye for selecting material.

 

Guest Artist - Ted Matson - Lecture/ Demo

Date: Thursday, April 26 - Please note change of day

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time: 7:00

Double your raffle chances by displaying a bonsai at the meeting.

February Meeting

Jim Hughes, curator of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, presented an excellent PowerPoint program describing the Museum, its projects and plans, as well as his role in maintaining the American, Japanese , and Chinese bonsai in the collection. This was a great opportunity to learn more about an extremely valuable resource and source of inspiration that is only a few hours drive away. Many thanks to Jim for in interesting and informative program.

 

Winner of the MABS raffle was Howard Dunetz - congratulations!

Flower Show Exhibit

This year's PBS Exhibit at the Philadelphia Flower Show continued the tradition of displaying great trees that generated a tremendous amount of interest (and questions) from visitors. Whether puzzling over "What is training?", or admiring the sculptural shapes of the ancient-appearing trees, the public was favorably impressed by the exhibit and by those members who volunteered to man the exhibit and field all those "Is it real?", "What does training mean?" and "I had one once, but it died - Why?" questions.

A huge thanks has to be extended to all those members who acted as bonsai guides while sitting for the exhibit, and to those who placed their trees on exhibit.

No PBS Flower Show Exhibit could be successful without the ongoing coordination with the Horticultural Society and the organization by our Exhibit Chair - Randy Naftal. "Thank you, Randy" seems a bit insufficient for all the effort and time he has put in.

 

2007 PBS Exhibitors

Linda Brant
Hinoki Cypress
John Constantine
American Larch
Dominick Haigh
Hinoki Cypress
Paul Krasner
Ponderosa Pine
Mark Maher
Bougainvillea
Mike Marinelli
Azalea
Howard McNeal
Japanese White Pine
Howard McNeal
Mugo Pine
Randy Naftal
Procumbens juniper
Chase Rosade
Mistletoe Fig
Solita Rosade
Triangle Fig
Allen Slye
Boulevard Cypress
Walter Scott
Elephant Bush(Portulacaria afra)
Ron Solt
Wisteria

 

 

Future Meetings

April 26** - Ted Matson - Lecture/ Demo

May - TBA

June 17 - Picnic & Auction -Rosade Bonsai Studio

Dues Reminder

Just a reminder - Our membership year ends May 31, so why not renew early.

Dues remain at $20.00 - You can pay at the next meetings or send a check to:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 19477

Seasonal Notes

We're rapidly approaching the start of our growing season. Won't it be nice to see some blooms on our bonsai and leaves beginning to develop? Soon we'll be busy watering and fertilizing - this is what we've waited for since last October.

Repotting is on the top of the must-do list right now. Tree that have been stored indoors have begun to push growth quite strongly. If you are into leaf break already, think hard and long before repotting. If only buds are showing, go ahead and repot. Those trees that wintered inside and are pushing hard, should be placed outdoors as soon as practical - you may have to bring them in at night to avoid frost or freeze damage for a few more weeks - filtered light may be best until the danger of leaf burn is past. Protect any tree that has been repotted from freezing.

There are two schools of thought regarding the repotting of azaleas; one is that repotting should be done before blooming occurs (the majority of flower buds removed), the other school of thought is to repot after blooming. Both seem to work, so the choice is yours.

Be sure to identify in some way those tree with wire on them. Once leaves have opened, it's difficult to spot wire that is starting to cut in. Check the trees weekly to see if removal of wire is necessary on deciduous trees.

MidAtlantic Festival

This year's 24th MidAtlantic Spring Festival promises to be a great one. Three talented bonsai artists - Robert Steven from Indonesia, Guy Guidry from Louisiana, and Ted Matson from California will share their knowledge, experiences, and talent with the registrants. The members' exhibit should be even better than previous years' exhibits.

We hope you can make it for the entire fantastic weekend - if not, try to make it for either the Saturday or Sunday program. Lots of great vendors, terrific workshops, silent auctions, raffles, and a Banquet Auction are just bonuses beyond the artists' presentations for those who attend. For a complete list of participating vendors, go to the MABS site: http://midatlanticbonsai.freeservers.com/

Remember, your attendance benefits PBS directly. Hope to see you there!

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

 

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) -Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476) - Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202 - Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

 

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May 2007

May Meeting

May brings us flowers, and our guest artist for May, Robert Mahler. Bob became interested in bonsai at an early age, receiving his early bonsai instruction from Chase Rosade from 1985 to 1990. Upon graduation from high school, Bob was awarded an apprenticeship from with Susumu Sudo in Tochigi-ken outside of Tokyo.. Bob spent 4 years in Japan training with Sudo, and upon his return to the US, became the Curator of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens from 1995 to 2005. Following his years at Brooklyn, Bob has maintained an impressive private collection here in the area.

Bob has appeared at many local club programs, as well as regional and national conventions. He will be a featured artist at the 2007 International Bonsai Symposium in Rochester this September.

Bob exhibits tremendous talent and broad knowledge of bonsai cultivation. He has an excellent eye for design and has a thorough knowledge of Japanese techniques for growing and maintaining bonsai.

The demonstration material selected for the evening will be either a very nice Japanese white pine or an equally nice Satsuki azalea. The demo tree will be raffled. You can double your raffle chances by displaying a bonsai at the meeting.

 

Guest Artist - Robert Mahler - Lecture/ Demo

Date: Friday, May 18

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road, Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time: 7:00

 

Future Meetings

June 17 - Picnic & Auction -Rosade Bonsai Studio

September 14 - Julian Adams -Lecture/Demo

September 15-16 - PBS Exhibit - Japanese House

April Meeting

Our April meeting featured a lecture demonstration by Californian Ted Matson. Ted's demonstration material was a Kingsville boxwood measuring about 6-7 inches above the soil line, which fits nicely into the shohin classification, if one is going strictly by measurement.

Ted stressed that shohin bonsai is defined as much by a feeling of smallness as by actual size. A Shohin should "fit comfortably in the hand" to truly qualify.

Ted was pleased with the overall shape of the tree and remarked that he would spend most of the work time on scissor work and plucking. Very little wiring would be needed. He felt the tree would best be styled in the form of a live oak, and proceeded to work to remove the "crotch" growth, and remove a few branches moving in the wrong direction. Ted feels this "clean-out" done in the initial stages, really allows you to discover & define the tree and its style. He continued plucking the tree, removing old, heavy growth in order to favor new buds and new growth. Rather than style a tree to look stressed, one that has waged a battle with nature, Ted chose to show the tree in the peak of its growth cycle.

One final trick that Ted suggested was to shine a light through the tree and check the shadow. Overly dense areas would be readily shown.

The amazing part of the evening was that Ted was able to do two things simultaneously; concentrate on styling the tree, and give a steady stream of thoughts on many aspects of bonsai.

Many thanks to Ted for an informative and entertaining evening.

Our raffle winner for the evening was Patrick McCole - congratulations!

Seasonal Notes

Satsuki Azalea**

This is an evergreen azalea that originated in Japan. It differs from other members of the Rhododendron family in that it flowers in mid summer. The flowers of this group are slightly large for bonsai. Compensate for this by growing medium to large bonsai, counting on a mass display of flowers in summer. Because it has been hybridized for centuries in Japan, there are thousands of cultivars in a range of colors. Often multiple colors of flowers appear on one tree.

It is best grown in partial shade in summer. Watering is extremely important. It must not dry out. It has a fibrous root system that will suffer quickly if it dries out. The leaves benefit from misting. Both the soil and its fertilizer must be acid based to produce healthy growth and even flowering in the next season. If you have hard water, do not use it on Azaleas. Capture rain water for watering. Often rain water has the added benefit of being acidic.

Acid fertilizer should be applied in dilute solution on a daily basis up to flowering. Additional phosphate will insure better flowering for the next year. A dose of iron supplement improves the green color. After flowering carefully pick off dead heads. The first growth of new shoots can be eliminated. The secondary growth is then developed and trimmed into the next years shape. After flowering is completed, slow down the fertilizer schedule. The bonsai must be left out into the fall to facilitate flower bud development. The plant must be protected from winter freeze.

Because all Rhododendron species have dormant buds under all bark areas they are ideal subjects for severe pruning. All leaves can be cut off, even down to the bare trunk. The dormant buds will break out easily especially if you mist the bark frequently with a week fertilizer solution. Many shoots will sprout in few weeks. As the shoots develop, select the ones you needed for your design. Pinch new shoots to develop branches. Carefully monitor growth at this stage of rapid growth. Eliminating flower buds during the first year or two after this procedure will allow you to develop a better tree sooner.

If you plan on using this drastic cut back method, be sure to start with a healthy plant. If you keep the plant in its original training pot, new shoots will develop quickly due to the larger root system. If you cut back the root ball at the same time, development will be slower, but it can work. This procedure should be done in late winter or early spring. The age of the satsuki will not affect this procedure.

When styling a tree the advantageous buds make break back easy. All foliage can be cut off and new sprouts will develop in a matter of weeks. IF you have the right conditions (such as a greenhouse or artificial light growing area), you can trim the plant at any time. Under normal conditions, styling should occur in early spring before growth or immediately following flowering.

Removal of large branches on old plants can cause sap withdrawal. Take care to only do branch removal on VERY healthy plants. You may even take two years to remove a large branch by first removing a wedge at the removal point and fill the hole with cut paste to remove the complete branch the second spring.

If starting with young whips, concentrate on shaping the trunk with wire remembering that branches can form all along the trunk line.

Repotting is done immediately after flowering into acid soil. Extra peat may be added to the soil. Be careful in trimming the root mass. Azaleas can quickly develop a solid root ball. This needs to be thinned when transplanting. Use a well-drained pot and put a drainage layer in the bottom of the pot before the extra peat soil layer. Some artists prefer kanuma soil from Japan. Remove all soil with a hose when repotting and then trim the roots.

**Originally published in "The Twig", the newsletter of the Mohawk-Hudson Bonsai Society, by Pauline Muth - Used with permission of the author.

Ed note - Pauline resides in the Albany area - our azaleas are about 3 weeks ahead of hers. In our area greenhouse protection is not necessary, but some shelter from wind is necessary.

MidAtlantic Festival

What a great weekend! The demo trees turned out very well and the artists had lots to teach. Thanks to Mike Marinelli, Ron Solt, and Paul Krasner for exhibiting their bonsai representing PBS. Thanks, also to Betty Marinelli, Pat Morris, Linda, Brant, Ron Solt, and Jim Gillespie for their help with the Auctions.

Next year's Festival mark the 25th anniversary of MidAtlantic, so watch for a really special weekend next spring.

Dues Notice

It's that time of the year again! Our membership year ends with the last day of May. If your address label has an 06/07 on it, please send your dues check to our treasurer, Dave Spirt, as soon as possible. Labels displaying an 07/08 indicate dues are paid for the 2007-8 year. Dues remain at $20.00. The mailing address is:

 

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 19477

 

You can clip and send the form on the right, or pay at the May or June meetings. PBS dues are among the lowest in the region, with some exceptional member benefits.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)

Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476)

Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202

Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

Greater Plymouth Community Center

2910 Jolly Road, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

Phone: 6102774312

http://www.plymouthcommunitycenter.org

 

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June 2007

June Picnic & Acution

 Our last meeting for the 2006-07 year brings us to the Annual Picnic and Auction. Hosts Chase and Solita Rosade have promised us wonderful weather for this year's picnic and auction. The Rosade bonsai collection is always a treat to see.

Each year a good deal of great bonsai material, pots, books, tools, and other bonsai related items come up for auction. Lots of spirited bidding results from so many quality items in the auction. Please be sure to check your collection. Maybe a tree that's just not coming exactly the way you'd like will be treasured by another. Perhaps that pot that's been collecting dust on a shelf all these years has the exact right tree waiting for it - in someone else's collection! Give them a chance at happiness! That tool you bought but never used, has a buyer just waiting for it this weekend. Books you've read and re-read, now gathering dust on a shelf, could be a treasure for another reader. This is our prime fund-raising event. Without your donations and participation, the wonderful speakers and activities we're used to seeing won't be there, so join the fun, bring some items, and buy lots of items at our Picnic & Auction.

PBS will supply a hot dog lunch with a beverage. Members are asked to bring an appetizer, a picnic salad, or a dessert to share. Please bring your own lawn chair.

See you there!!

PBS Annual Picnic & Auction

Date: Sunday, June 17

Times (approximate): Picnic - 1:00

Auction - 2:00

Location: Rosade Bonsai Studio - 6912 Ely Rd. New Hope, PA

Phone: 215-862-5925

Future Meetings

September 14 - Julian Adams -Lecture - Scots pine

September 15-16 - PBS Exhibit - Japanese House

October 19 - Peter Adams - Lecture/Demo

May Meeting

Last month's PBS meeting featured Robert Mahler, who is the prime caretaker for the "Kennet Collection" of Mr. Doug Paul. Bob demonstrated the method to improve a field grown tree, in this case, an imported Japanese white pine. Bob estimated the age of the tree at 30-35 years, although the tree, as a result of the growing techniques in Japan, appeared much older.

While some very rough training had been done while the tree was in the ground, Bob pointed out that he would be performing the initial styling of the tree. An analysis of the branch structure determined that most of the branches were usable at present, and that what was needed was some basic wiring. Bob said that the placement of the tree in the pot was incorrect, and that the planting angle needed adjustment - both shortcomings were a result of the necessity of potting up a large shipment of trees in a short time period.

Before beginning to wire, Bob stated that the tree should be well stabilized in the pot in order to avoid root damage during the wiring process. To ensure the tree would not move, he wrapped wire around the pot and over the root mass. He pointed out that at this time of year any wiring done should done so carefully, as the branches are full of sap and could break easily.

Beginning with the bottom branches, Bob lowered each after a careful wiring. Little by little, as each branch was placed, a real treasure began to emerge. With a few final adjustments, the tree was presented, and we were treated to a classic pine bonsai. Bob did an incredible job of wiring, given the allotted time (not one crossed wire!!), all the while giving out a tremendous amount of styling and growing tips and techniques. Thanks Bob!!

Our raffle winner for the evening was Karen Harkaway - congratulations! -You're the envy of every member in attendance. Attendance for the evening was great, and we had a large number of trees brought in for exhibit.

September Exhibit

Very soon it will be time to start getting your trees in shape to join us for the PBS exhibit at the Japanese House and Garden ("Shofuso") in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. Last year we had a great turn out, which helped both the Japanese House and PBS.

Who: All members, both new and experienced, alike are requested to display a bonsai.

When: September 15-16.

For more information or to sign up for exhibit, contact Mike Marinelli, who is coordinating the Japanese House Exhibit, at (609-234-6644) or email: marinelli1156@comcast.net .

Informal exhibits such as the one in the Japanese House allow us to display our efforts at bonsai, as well as inform the general public about the fascinating culture of bonsai in a relaxed and quiet atmosphere..

Seasonal Notes

This is a great time of year for bonsai growers!! The azaleas are in bloom, the deciduous trees are pushing out new growth, and the conifers' candles are sprouting. We can stand back for a moment and admire Nature at it's finest, but only for a moment. We have much work to do in the following weeks.....trimming deciduous growth, removing spent azalea flowers, and candle pruning on the pines. It's also time to think about fertilizing, insect and disease control. Once temperatures are in the sixties, your trees can take in the nourishment you provide. Organics seem to be preferred more and more by our guest lecturers. Some choices are fertilizer cakes, fish emulsion, liquid kelp, and liquid seaweed. All of these do a good job of providing a steady rate of feeding.

Insect control can be problematic - we want the beneficial insects to stay with us while eliminating those who are destructive. Many growers say to do nothing until you see a problem, thus avoiding too much insecticide in the environment. Use of the correct product is important i.e.. Spider mites are not insects, they are arachnids, and don't respond to some insecticides - a miticide is needed to control the little critters.

Regular spraying for fungus problems becomes necessary as the humidity and temperatures climb.

Dues Notice

It's that time of the year again! Our membership year ends with the last day of May. If your address label has an 06/07 on it, please send your dues check to our treasurer, Dave Spirt, as soon as possible. Labels displaying an 07/08 indicate dues are paid for the 2007-8 year. Dues remain at $20.00. The mailing address is:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 19477

You can clip and send the form on the right, or pay at the Picnic. PBS dues are among the lowest in the region, with some exceptional member benefits.

Directions to the Rosade Bonsai Studio

Central New Jersey - route 95 west to Rt 29 north to Lambertville, left on Rt 179 at light, cross bridge to New Hope. Turn right at first light Rt 32 north. Go 2 1/2 miles on Rt 32 to Ely Rd, turn Left on Ely for 1 mile - studio on left (sign) at end of long driveway

Philadelphia & South - Delaware, Maryland, D.C. etc - I 95 north to last exit in Pennsylvania # 51- left at stop sign. Follow signs and Rt 32 North for 10 miles into New Hope. From traffic light in center of New Hope continue straight (North on Rt 32 ) for 2 1/2 miles to Ely Rd on Left, 1 mile on Ely Rd to studio on left (sign)

Philadelphia & West - Pennsylvania Turnpike East to exit # 27 (Willow Grove) North on Rt 611 approximately 10 miles just south of Doylestown . Exit right to New Hope Rt 202 North. Follow Rt 202 North to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn left North on 32 about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. Studio on left at the end of a long driveway.

Allentown and North - take the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike south to Quakertown exit #32. Go north toward Quakertown on Rt 663 (which becomes Rt 313 East) through Crosskeys to Rt 202 north. Follow Rt 202 north to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn North on 32 to about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. Studio on left at the end of a long driveway.

 

 

 

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September 2007

Our new meeting year begins with a presentation by Julian Adams. His topic for the evening will be Scots pine as bonsai material. As proprietor of Adams' Bonsai, Julian has been active in bonsai since receiving a gift bonsai in 1971. Beyond improving his own bonsai skills, Julian's primary interest is to make bonsai plants and supplies conveniently available to bonsai enthusiasts and to spread the word about this great art form. Adams' Bonsai began as a small bonsai business to sell excess bonsai stock and to make pots, tools, and other bonsai supplies available in Central Virginia. This activity has developed into a licensed nursery specializing in the propagation of hardy varieties particularly suited for bonsai use and the development of advanced bonsai stock from these varieties. A sub specialty of this nursery is the propagation of hardy accent plant material. Julian maintains a personal bonsai collection of more than fifty finished bonsai and is currently is growing over two thousand plants for bonsai or accent use. He writes extensively about bonsai via articles for English language bonsai publications and the Central Virginia Bonsai Society newsletter, authoring articles on a variety of bonsai topics published in International Bonsai, BCI's BONSAI MAGAZINE, and BONSAI: Journal of the American Bonsai Society. His bonsai have been selected for the WBC Top 100 contest in 1999 (Scots pine), 2000 (yatsabusa elm), and 2006 (Scots pine). He presently is serving as a board member of the National Bonsai Foundation as well as a board member & Vice President of the American Bonsai Society. His goal is to advance his understanding of the art, horticulture and philosophy inherent in bonsai and to disseminate this information to others through writing, teaching, and other related bonsai activities.

Julian will provide a pre-bonsai Scots pine for raffle. The winner can apply his newly gained information in the development of that tree.

Don't forget! - Bring in a bonsai to exhibit and discuss - double your raffle tickets (bonsai should be in a bonsai pot to qualify - prebonsai material is welcome for questions or discussion, too).

 

Guest Artist: Julian Adams -Lecture-Scots pine

Date: Friday, September 14, 2007

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time: 7:00

 

September Exhibit

Very soon it will be time to start getting your trees in shape to join us for the PBS exhibit at the Japanese House and Garden ("Shofuso") in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. Last year we had a great turn out and great weather, which helped both the Japanese House and PBS.

Who: All members, both new and experienced, alike are requested to display a bonsai.

When: September 15-16.

For Exhibitors: Setup time on Saturday, 9:00am - 10:00 - bring your tree(s) and display stand(s). Companion plants are optional. Tear-down approximately 4:30 on Sunday

For more information or to sign up for exhibit, contact Mike Marinelli, who is coordinating the Japanese House Exhibit, at (609-234-6694) or email: marinelli1156@comcast.net .

Please try to make time in your busy schedule to volunteer to assist PBS in our Fall Exhibit.

Informal exhibits such as the one in the Japanese House allow us to display our efforts at bonsai, as well as inform the general public about the fascinating culture of bonsai in a relaxed and quiet atmosphere.

Silent Auction

Did you know that each month, any member may bring in an item or two he or she wishes to offer for Silent Auction? Proceeds are split 80-20 (80% to the member, 20% to PBS). Starting price is determined by the seller, and all sales are final. We request that sellers limit the number of silent auction items to one or two for each meeting. Be sure to look for these Silent Auction items at each meeting!

Upcoming Bonsai Events

September 6-9 - International Bonsai-Shohin Bonsai Symposium - Rochester, NY www.internationalbonsai.com

September 15-16 - PBS Exhibit - Japanese House in Fairmount Park - Hrs.: 11-5 each day

September 22&emdash;National Bonsai & Penjing Museum - Chinese Autumn Festival, National Arboretum,Washington, DC. - Hrs.: 5-8:30 pm www.bonsai-nbf.org

September 29 - PBS display at the 4th Annual Celebrate Japan Day - University of Pennsylvania Museum Rotunda- 3260 South St., Philadelphia - Hrs.: 11-4

www.museum.upenn.edu

September 29 - Rosade Bonsai Studio - Fall Open House - Hrs.: 11-5 www.rosadebonsai.com

October 20 - Nature's Way Nursery - Fall Open House - Hrs.: 9-6 www.natureswaybonsai.com

October 27&emdash;National Bonsai & Penjing Museum - Fall Foliage and Fruit Exhibit, National Arboretum,Washington, DC. - Hrs.: 10-3:30 www.bonsai-nbf.org

President's Notes

Dear Members,

 

We have another year of Bonsai in front of us. This will be my 5th year as your President. What a summer it has been, hot but not as dry as other years.

 

How quickly time goes by and , we have another year of programs in front of us. The PBS board has once again arranged to bring in quality programs to meet the varied needs of our members.

 

This year we are going to do something new for our display at the Japanese Tea House.

We are going to provide three (3) awards for exhibited trees.

Yes - not one or two, but three:

First - will be the President's Award. I will select a tree which I feel best provides the feeling of a Bonsai. It will be open to all both experts and novice alike.

Second &endash; the People Choice Award. As people go through our display during the Saturday tour they will be provided a ballot to vote on the Bonsai which they believe they like the best. This is also open to all.

Third &endash; the PBS Board Award, each of our board members who are at the Tea House will vote on the tree which they feel is the best. This is open at all but the PBS Board members.

We will provide the awards at our Oct. meeting. Mike M.

Future Meetings

October 19 - Peter Adams - Lecture/Demo

November 16 - Members' Auction

December 14 - Holiday Social / Wintering Bonsai

Seasonal Notes

When to Fertilize? This is the subject of some controversy. The conventional wisdom is to fertilize when the plants are in active growth. This generally is after bud break in the spring until late summer. The contention is that feeding well into the fall and early winter with nitrogen will force new growth that will be killed by frost. It now appears that this is a myth.

Plants begin setting buds in mid to late summer. Nitrogen does fuel new growth, but plays no role in initiating bud break. This is related to day length only. Cold hardiness acquisition is related to lowered temperatures and can actually be enhanced by regular fertilization with balanced levels of nitrogen. Based on these findings there is no reason not to continue balanced fertilizer feeding well into the fall and early winter. As long as the soil temperature is above about 55ºF plants will continue to absorb and store nitrogen as well as phosphorus and potassium. This storage of fertilizer by the plant plays a very important role in fueling new growth in the early spring when soil temperatures are cold and nitrogen is hard to acquire.

The conventional wisdom also says fertilizing with high levels of phosphorus in the fall will prepare the plant for winter by increasing its cold hardiness acquisition. There is no credible evidence to support this contention.

Nitrogen is the first number given on the label, (ex. 5-10-10). The second number refers to Phosphorus, which enhances root and cell tissue development and regulates flowering and fruiting. A fertilizer with a high Phosphorus number is desirable at this time of year. The third number refers to Potassium, which promotes circulation and production of sap, and promotes flowering and fruiting.

Three large numbers will usually be prominent on the front of the package. This is the NPK analysis. . Numbers such as 15-15-15, 20-20-20, or 18-6-12 are common. These numbers are the percentage by weight of the N-P-K , nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contained in the fertilizer.

MidAtlantic Festival

The big news about the 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival is the new venue - The Hudson Valley Resort and Spa, Kerhonkson, NY located in the Catskills. This facility is a full family resort offering pools, golf, spa facilities, restaurants, and other amenities. Hotel rates remain the same as in past years, as does festival registration.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of MABS, and the guest artists are as special as the event - Min Hsuan Lo (Taiwan), Graham Potter, (UK), Michael Hagadorn (USA), and George LeBolt (USA). Each of these talented artists will be conducting lecture/demonstrations, critiques, and workshops during the weekend.

The new facility also will allow a larger vendor area with wider aisles and less crowding.

Be sure to mark your calendar now for the 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival, April 11-13!!

BCI Convention

Tropical Enchantment, BCI-FELAB 2007 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 11 - 15th, was an outstanding convention. Pennsylvania Bonsai Society was represented by Linda and Jim Brant , Solita and Chase Rosade, and Mary Kay and Jim Doyle.

A large variety of workshops was offered. Everything from stone collecting and daiza making to producing a club newsletter was covered. Headliners, Marco Invernizzi (Italy), Shinji Suzuki (Japan), David Benavente (Spain), not only put on informative workshops, but also exciting demonstrations. Other workshop leaders/demonstrators were Robert Martinez (Puerto Rico), Suthin Sukosolvisit (US), William Valavanis (US), Sean Smith (US), Pedro Morales (Puerto Rico), Arthur Skolnik (Canada), Xenio Baron (Martinique), Yrene Morales (Puerto Rico) and Milagros Rauber (Puerto Rico).

Each convention meal was also a party of entertainment, dancing and good food. Offered during and after the convention was a bus tour of three outstanding bonsai collections outside of San Juan.

I know that each time I visit Puerto Rico, my appreciation for tropical bonsai grows. The exhibit at the convention, designed by Bill Valavanis, was outstanding (see photos).

Save your Euros because BCI 2008 will be held in St. Vincent, Italy next September! Watch your BONSAI and Stone Appreciation Magazine for details.

Submitted by Linda Brant

Dues Notice

Dues for the 2007 -08 year are now payable. Check your mailing label - an 06/07 in the lower right corner means that your membership has expired, and this will be your last newsletter , an 07/08 means your dues are current. Please keep your membership active by mailing the attached dues form .

Dues remain at $20.00. The mailing address is:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 19477

You can clip and send the form on the right, or pay at the September meeting. PBS dues are among the lowest in the region, with some exceptional member benefits.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

 

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)

Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476)

Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202

Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

Greater Plymouth Community Center

2910 Jolly Road, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

 

Dues Form - 2007-2008 - Annual Membership.......June 1 to May 31................$20.00

 

Name______________________________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________

City, State, Zip___________________________________________________________________

Home Phone________________ Cell Phone**______________________Email__________________________________

 

CHOOSE ONE PLEASE: Send my newsletter by_______Email __________US mail

**Your cell phone number will be used only in the event of a cancellation, when you cannot be reached at the home number.

 

 

 

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October 2007

October Meeting

They say that the third time is the charm. This month we welcome, returning for his third visit to PBS , Peter Adams from the state of Washington. Peter has authored numerous books on bonsai which have been very well received, his latest being an excellent book on Japanese maples with photos by his wife, Kate.

Throughout his pursuit of the fine arts (he holds a post-graduate degree in painting from the Royal Academy Schools in London), Peter always maintained an interest in bonsai, becoming recognized internationally as a bonsai master and author.

What distinguishes Peter both as an author and a bonsai artist is his vast knowledge of horticulture combined with his grasp of bonsai aesthetics. It is his ability to communicate those two disciplines clearly and powerfully that contributes to the value of his presentations. Previous visits with PBS have resulted in some great demonstrations and a great deal of information, so please join us for an educational and artistic experience with Peter Adams.

Peter's demo material, a Scots pine, will be raffled, and those members displaying a finished bonsai will receive double raffle tickets.

 

Guest Artist: Peter Adams -Lecture/Demo

Date: Friday, October 19

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time: 7:00


Future Meetings

November 16 - Members' Auction

December 14 - Holiday Social / Wintering Bonsai

January 19 - Workshop - Flower Show


Silent Auction

Did you know that each month, any member may bring in an item or two he or she wishes to offer for Silent Auction? Proceeds are split 80-20 (80% to the member, 20% to PBS). Starting price is determined by the seller, and all sales are final. We request that sellers limit the number of silent auction items to one or two for each meeting. Be sure to look for these Silent Auction items at each meeting!

September Meeting

Julian Adams introduced himself as a "bonsai farmer" rather than a bonsai artist. His September program certainly demonstrated his knowledge of bonsai horticulture, so the "bonsai farmer" label was not out of line, but his program also exhibited a fine sense of the artistry of bonsai making Julian a bit modest in the application of bonsai artist to his resumé.

Adams is a strong advocate of scots pine as the best possible pine for use as bonsai in our area. He gave a long list of reasons we should consider Scots pine for our bonsai. Here a just a few:

Easily propagated

Readily available

Hardy to -30º F

Fast grower in ground -slow grower in bonsai cultivation

Buds back readily

Needle reduce easily with proper care

Bark assumes a rough, old texture quickly

Relatively disease-free

Julian's PowerPoint presentation was informative and comprehensive, stressing knowledge of the annual growth cycle as the key to success with Scots pine as bonsai (and in actuality, any tree).

Our raffle winner, Betty Marinelli, took home a scots pine ready for her to design!

 

President's Notes

Dear Members,

It's been a very busy start of the fall session this year, with both our Japanese House display and followed-up with a display and lecture at the Univ. of Penn.

I would first like to thank all who were able to bring a tree for the display at the Japanese House. What a great time we had at the Tea House (Shofuso). You could not ask for a better setting to display our Bonsai. Everyone who saw them was impressed once again. We had over thirty people in our lecture this year and all were overwhelmed with all of our trees. Each year the quality of our trees are improving. This year on Sunday, our trees provided the back drop for a traditional Japanese tea ceremony which was led by a local tea master.

We also started something new this year for the Shofuso exhibit, three awards:

President's Award

People's Choice Award

PBS Board Award

And the Winners are........Come out to our upcoming meeting to see if YOU won one of the awards.

We were asked to do something new this year, to support the 4th Annual Celebrate Japan Day at the University of Pennsylvania Museum Rotunda. We provided eight beautiful trees for a display; also we provided a lecture on Bonsai. It was a nice location and a great day (even though I gave up going to the Phillies game). This is a way for PBS as a club to give back to the community and to educate the younger generation on our fine art.

I'm sitting in my back yard with my lap-top watching the first Phillies play-off game in fourteen years. So I hope when we next meet that they are still playing October ball.

Thanks to every one who supported each of these events.

Mike M.

Upcoming Bonsai Events

October 20 - Nature's Way Nursery - Fall Open House - Hrs.: 9-6 www.natureswaybonsai.com

October 27&emdash;National Bonsai & Penjing Museum - Fall Foliage and Fruit Exhibit, National Arboretum,Washington, DC. - Hrs.: 10-3:30 - free- www.bonsai-nbf.org

November 4 - Rosade Bonsai Studio - Visiting Master's Series with Salvatore Liporace and Patrizia Cappellaro - registration required - www. rosadebonai.com

November 10-11 - Brandywine Bonsai Society - Bonsai Exhibit at Longwood Gardens -admission - www.gobbs.org

Japanese House Exhibit

This year's exhibit at the Japanese Tea House featured a larger number of trees than previous years, a total of twenty-three trees, many with very nice accent plantings. Many thanks to those participated in exhibiting their bonsai - Kevin Clare, Joanne Dohdy, Karen Harkaway, Jim Gillespie, Paul Krasner, Mike Marinelli, Howard McNeal, Ron Solt, and Linda & Jim Brant. The Tea House is a great venue for displaying bonsai, its unique setting lending to the atmosphere of tranquility.

ABS Convention

Virginia Beach ABS Learning Seminars 2007

Submitted by Karen Harkaway -Photos by Paul Krasner

From June 21 to 24, 2007, the American Bonsai Society convened for "Bonsai by the Beach", their unique Learning Seminar in beautiful Virginia Beach, VA. As in the past, The Learning Seminars were an excellent format by which to accumulate a lot of knowledge in a little time. In fact, it could have been held anywhere, because we didn't get outside at all with all the fascinating courses, teachers, auctions and vendors at the convention inside!! Many excellent instructors shared their knowledge, including Marty Schmalenberg, Julian Adams, Mike Hagedorn, Pauline Muth, Bill Valavanis, Mary Miller, and Suthin Sukosolvisit , to name a few. Classes varied in level of expertise from the annual Introduction to Bonsai, a two-day course taught by Pauline Muth, to learning how to lecture and present on the subject of bonsai, taught by Mary Miller. As always, the camaraderie experienced by those who attended left lasting impressions, and the desire to travel next year to the next ABS Learning Seminars location, San Antonio, TX. Many of us are planning to attend, so make plans to join us!

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)

Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476)

Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202

Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

 

 

 

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November 2007

November Meeting

This November's meeting brings us to the (sometimes) annual Fall Members' Auction. This auction provides our members with an opportunity to buy and sell materials at an auction with 80% of the selling price going to the seller. Terms are; Absolute auction, no reserve.

Last year's auction was cancelled due to a water main break. Hopefully, the main will remain repaired!

This is an opportunity to thin your collection, or to add some material to it for winter and early spring work. Bonsai, pots, prebonsai stock, tools, magazines, or any bonsai-related item may be offered for auction. This year we anticipate some larger, established pieces coming up for auction. We look forward to a good turnout, both of sellers and buyers. Be sure not to miss this tremendous bonsai opportunity. Bring some things to sell and take home something you've bought - (balance is important!).

We're also going to continue the Silent Auction this year with selected items being offered, placing your written bids on a list. Check the lists as the evening goes on and make sure that yours is the winning bid when the close of that auction is announced. Items designated for silent auction (only) may have a reserve (minimum) price. All items sold at regular auction will be sold without minimums.

PBS reserves the right to limit items based upon available time- we must be out of the building by 10pm. In order to auction this in the fairest possible manner, you'll be asked to label each item both for accounting purposes as well as selling priority . For example, if you have five items, you would label each with a number and a letter (which will give your priority). When the auction starts, all items with an A letter will be auctioned first, then those labeled B, and so on. This way, each seller will have an equal exposure.

This is a great evening and loads of fun, so add to the enjoyment with your participation.

Members' Auction

Date: Friday, November 16

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center, 2910 Jolly Road

Plymouth Meeting, PA

Time(s): (Check-in) - 7:00 - (Auction begins) - 7:30

Future Meetings

December 14 - Holiday Social / Wintering Bonsai
January 19 - Workshop - Flower Show
February 15 - Lecture Demo - Howard McNeal

October Meeting

October's featured artist, Peter Adams, added to our knowledge of Scots pines and proceeded to create a great literati-style tree.

Peter likes Scots pine for bonsai for many of the reasons that were given in last month's program by Julian Adams. This pine will bud back readily, adapts very well to pot culture, can produce very small needles, and can reward the careful grower with a marvelous tree.

He thinks that one of the keys to success with scots pine is to avoid too much nitrogen when fertilizing. preferring fish emulsion, or liquid kelp and seaweed. Peter prefers aluminum wire for styling, stating that he feels aluminum is softer and easier on the tree.

As the tree took form, Peter commented that a successful bonsai is an accumulation of little things -treating jins, careful branch placement, avoidance of bark damage, etc.. He firmly believes in a program of gradual development of a bonsai rather than "instant bonsai", and is offering an extensive bonsai development service. His application of a sculptural solution to styling was apparent with the finished demonstration. His rendering of the future tree allowed us to share his vision. Peter's tree formed an excellent foundation for our raffle winner, Andy Kline, to build upon.

Return of a Raffle Winner

This is Peter Adam's demo tree from the June 2006 program. The tree was raffled, along with a drawing by Peter showing his vision of the future bonsai.

Ron Solt was the raffle winner, and it's apparent that he's well on the way to completing the development of a superior tree.

President's Notes

Dear Members,

 

If you were at our last meeting you saw who were our first award winners for their trees at the Japanese Tea House. If you missed them the winners were:

•President's Award &endash; Paul Krasner

•People Choice Award &endash; Howard McNeal

• PBS Board Award &endash; Ron Solt

This meeting we have our member auction. I have seen some of the items this year and you don't want to miss it (and bring $$). This is a Win/Win/Win meeting for everyone:

•Win - for you to bid and receive some good items,

•Win - for you to clean out some items and get 80% of the proceeds,

•Win - for our club who will receive 20% of the proceeds.

Whether you are new or old to our club you don't want to miss our V.P. Jim Gillespie as our auctioneer. He always impresses me with his knowledge and skill and it will be lots of fun.

Thanks,

Mike Marinelli

MidAtlantic Festival

Be sure to mark your calendar now for the 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival, April 11-13!! This year marks the 25th anniversary of MABS, and the guest artists are as special as the event - Min Hsuan Lo (Taiwan), Graham Potter, (UK), Michael Hagadorn (USA), and George LeBolt (USA). Each of these talented artists will be conducting lecture/demonstrations, critiques, and workshops during the weekend.

The 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival has a new site - The Hudson Valley Resort and Spa, in the Catskills at Kerhonkson, NY. This facility is a full family resort offering pools, golf, spa facilities, restaurants, and other amenities. Hotel rates remain the same as in past years, as does festival registration. The new facility also will allow a larger vendor area with wider aisles and less crowding. If you are interested in exhibiting a tree at MABS (PBS should exhibit three trees), or donating an item for the Auction, please contact Jim Brant or Jim Gillespie. The Festival is a bit further away than before, but the facility, the friendship, the raffles, the vendors, and the knowledge gained make it worth the trip

Upcoming Bonsai Events

November 1- December 2 - Bonsai: Living Art of the Susquehanna Bonsai Club at Hershey Gardens - www.HersheyGardens.org
November 10-11 - Brandywine Bonsai Society - Bonsai Exhibit at Longwood Gardens -admission - www.gobbs.org

Seasonal Notes

Talk about wacky weather!! We just experienced our first frost the last week of October, which for us here in Royersford, is about two weeks late. In the landscape, lots of leaves have dropped due to the drought, but not many as a result of fall. The maples in our area are just beginning to turn, but the mountain ash are nearly bare -go figure!

We've had some real extremes of precipitation and temperatures this year. Hopefully your trees thrived through it all, but who know what coming this winter?

Now is the time to start really thinking about and preparing for winter storage. Your trees need protection from the wind and sun, with some protection for the roots from temperature extremes. The tree species needs to be taken into consideration, too. Wintering for a larch is much different than that for a trident maple.

Watering will be cut down considerably in the coming days. The trees will need only enough to keep the soil from going bone-dry. Keep trees outside until they are truly dormant -even in dormancy they will need water so continue monitoring. Consistent temperatures below 40 ensure dormancy. In our area, thanksgiving weekend seems to be about the right time to put the trees into winter storage (and avoid Black Friday!).

Make up some tags for trees to help you to remember which ones need winter and early spring work, and note those trees that may need special attention over the winter, due to being rootbound, having a cracked pot, or being in a weakened state. Use different colors to designate those needing repotting, and those needing wiring or pruning. Locate the trees that need work where you can get to them at the appropriate time. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to get to a tree while having to step over twenty others without breaking anything.

Weather Related Meeting Notification

Over the years, we have had very few cancellations due to the weather, but sometimes we get caught in a storm. If we are faced with a cancellation, the following procedures will take place.

A. If you are on the email list for newsletters - you will receive cancellation notice by email.

B. If you are not on the email list, then check the web site. Cancellation notice will be posted prominently on the home page.

C. If you do not have computer access, a board member will contact you by phone.

D. We will also try to place a notice on KYW radio.

If you are in doubt about a meeting taking place, be sure to check before leaving home.

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)

Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476)

Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202

Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

 

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December 2007

Season's Greetings!

2007 seems to be flying by, or so it seems, and we've arrived at one of our members' favorite programs, that of our Holiday Social. Each year we have a bunch of raffle surprises - pots, tools, wire, trees, whatever...- and lots of fun trying to separate the good items from the "zonks". There's even somewhat of a treasure hunt - which is trying to find the package containing the free MidAtlantic registration. That's right, one of the beautifully wrapped packages will contain a free, full registration to the 2008 MidAtlantic Bonsai Societies Festival, but be careful, packages can be deceiving.

This year's program will feature a short PowerPoint presentation on Wintering Bonsai. One of the questions that comes up quite often is "How do I care for my bonsai over the winter?". Our presentation will try to give you some answers and some ideas for successful winter storage.

Please bring a goodie to share -some cookies, or dips, or whatever you'd like. PBS will furnish cold drinks.

Our Holiday Social promises to be a great evening and loads of fun, so add to the enjoyment with your attendance and participation.

Holiday Social & Wintering Program

Date: Friday, December 14

Location: Greater Plymouth Community Center

Time: 7:00

Future Meetings

January 19 - Workshop - Flower Show

February 15 - Lecture Demo - Howard McNeal

March 2-9 - PBS Exhibit - Philadelphia Flower Show

November Meeting

Our Members' Auction , held last month was very successful. Some very nice material changed hands with some spirited bidding taking place, (there's a rumor that even some phone bids were occurring!). Jim Gillespie, our auctioneer, kept things moving right along as he led bidders toward their final yes or no, giving all of us lots of bonsai information along the way. The evening ended with a total of approximately $1100 in gross receipts, and of that, over $800 to the sellers. Linda Brant and Betty Marinelli kept careful records of the proceedings, while Mike Marinelli and Jim Brant kept the items flowing. Thanks to all the buyers and sellers with a special thanks to those who made some donations for making the evening a success.

MidAtlantic Festival

Be sure to mark your calendar now for the 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival, April 11-13!! This year marks the 25th anniversary of MABS, and the guest artists are as special as the event - Min Hsuan Lo (Taiwan), Graham Potter, (UK), Michael Hagedorn (USA), and George LeBolt (USA). Each of these talented artists will be conducting lecture/demonstrations, critiques, and workshops during the weekend.

The 2008 MidAtlantic Spring Festival has a new site - The Hudson Valley Resort and Spa, in the Catskills at Kerhonkson, NY. This facility is a full family resort offering pools, golf, spa facilities, restaurants, and other amenities. Hotel rates remain the same as in past years, as does festival registration. The new facility also will allow a larger vendor area with wider aisles and less crowding. If you are interested in exhibiting a tree at MABS (PBS should exhibit three trees), or donating an item for the Auction, please contact Jim Brant or Jim Gillespie. The Festival is a bit further away than before, but the facility, the friendship, the raffles, the vendors, and the knowledge gained make it worth the trip

Seasonal Notes

Well, we're definitely (maybe) into late fall or early winter, depending on where you are. We've seen temperatures here as low as 18, then a few days later a high near 60. As I'm writing this, on Nov. 30, we had a low of 31 and won't get above 50, so it's time to get the trees into winter storage over the next few days.

A few things necessary for success:

Be sure the trees are well hydrated before an extended freeze, check on warmer days through the winter, too.

Clean off any remaining leaves.

Protect from the wind.

Shelter from direct sun , if possible.

Get the pot in contact with the soil and cover to maintain root temperature.

We'll get into far more detail with the December program for indoor and outdoor wintering.

National Bonsai Foundation

Are you a member and supporter of the National Bonsai Foundation? If not, please consider supporting an organization "created to develop an international living museum of the art of bonsai and penjing at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C."

The museum features an impressive display of bonsai and penjing, as well as programs and special exhibits throughout the year.

Your Basic membership of $35 is tax deductible. You can join or renew very easily on-line, or see Jim Brant for a membership form. PBS as a Society is an annual contributor.

The current exhibit, Winter Silhouette Bonsai/ Penjing Exhibit, runs from Dec. 8 &endash; 16 - and is open from 10am &endash; 3:30pm in the Special Exhibits Wing.

Weather Related Meeting Notification

Over the years, we have had very few cancellations due to the weather, but sometimes we get caught in a storm. If we are faced with a cancellation, the following procedures will take place.

A. If you are on the email list for newsletters - you will receive cancellation notice by email.

B. If you are not on the email list, then check the web site. Cancellation notice will be posted prominently on the home page.

C. If you do not have computer access, a board member will contact you by phone.

D. We will also try to place a notice on KYW radio.

If you are in doubt about a meeting taking place, be sure to check before leaving home.

 

Directions to the Greater Plymouth Community Center

From Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276)

Take Exit 333 (Norristown old exit 25). At the end of the ramp, turn left onto Plymouth Road. At the light, turn right onto Germantown Pike West. Continue approximately one (1) mile, through five (5) traffic lights. At the sixth light, turn right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Blue Route (I-476)

Take exit for Germantown Pike West (Exit 20). Continue on Germantown Pike west for approximately one (1) mile, through six (6) traffic lights. At the seventh light ti right onto Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

From Route 202

Follow Route 202 to Germantown Pike. Travel EAST on Germantown Pike, through five (5) traffic lights. At the next traffic light, approximately half a mile, turn left on Jolly Road. The Community Center is on the right at 2910 Jolly Road.

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