PBS Newsletter

Archives

2002

JAN.
FEB.
MAR.
APR.
MAY
JUNE
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC.

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January 2002

January Meeting

No formal meeting will be held for January, however we are scheduling an Exhibit Tree Workshop for all persons interested in exhibiting trees in the Philadelphia Flower show, as well as anyone who wants to learn more about preparing your bonsai for exhibit or just wants some help on their tree. Bring your trees for critique and hints. We need 13 trees for the exhibit, and this is the time to begin preparations and evaluations for the March show.

Exhibit Tree Workshop

Date: Saturday, January 19

Time 10:00 am

Location: Old Mill Bonsai Studio, Honeybrook, PA

 

Directions to Exhibit Workshop at Howard McNeal's

Take to PA Turnpike to the Downingtown Exit. Then take Rt. 100 south to Exton Square and Rt. 30 west. You can also take the Schuylkill expressway to Rt. 202 south to Rt. 30 west.

Next, take Rt. 322 out of Downingtown, cross over Rt. 82, then make a right on the next road. Go about 2 miles and cross over an iron bridge. At the next crossroad, make a right and go 3/10 mile to a Y in the road. House in on the right. Parking in the studio lot. Please phone Howard 610-942-2082 or Randy 610-942-7546 if you need further directions .

December Meeting

Holiday raffles, holiday cheer, and a great demonstration by Marty Schmalenberg closed out the year 2001. Fifteen items were raffled for our annual Holiday gathering. Bonsai pots, soil, tools, and a MidAtlantic Registration emerged from the brightly wrapped packages to the delight of raffle winners.

Our evening's program featured a lecture/demo by local bonsai artist, Marty Schmalenberg, who worked on two pitch pines, both in the literati, or bunjin style. Marty developed some background regarding literati using slides as illustrations, then moved into a discussion of applying the literati style to two very different pieces of material. The first piece was destined to become a single trunk literati, while the second became a forest style planting. With each of the pieces , Marty provided a drawing of a finished bonsai some years in the future.

Marty (and many other bonsai artists) name the literati style as one of the most difficult to achieve. The very simplicity of the style, the lack of branches, and the elusive proportions, make it so. Marty's efforts for the evening were most successful, attaining his goal of 'simplicity with balance and beauty'..... 'one of the most difficult qualities to attain'. Thanks to Marty for a most enjoyable evening.

Mark Maher was the lucky winner of the raffle tree.

 

Flower Show Notes

March will be here before we know it, and with the beginning of March comes the Philadelphia Flower Show. As always, we need members to volunteer to man the exhibit throughout the entire show. This is a very positive experience, answering questions from the public about the trees and bonsai in general, as well as eavesdropping on their comments.

In past years, we have overheard that the wires on the trees are used in shock treatment, we have had offers to buy the entire exhibit, we have overheard that the trees are grown from "bonsai seeds", or that the trees are thousands of years old. Of course the one question that most of us can relate to is ' I had a bonsai once, but it died. Why did it die?'

Please give Linda Brant (610-948-6380) a call and volunteer for exhibit sitting. One great benefit of sitting for the exhibit is the fact that we can offer you tickets for the Flower Show. This year, ticket prices for the show are $20.00 on weekdays and $22.00 on weekends - considering that PBS dues are $20.00, if you get two Flower Show tickets, you've made back the cost of your dues, plus parking. What a deal!!

MidAtlantic Symposium

Remember to mark your calendar for the upcoming MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 19-21, 2002. Next Spring's line up features bonsai artists Yasuo Mitsuya (Japan), Dan Barton (Great Britain), Kathy Shaner (California), Ed Trout (Florida), and Dale Cochoy (Ohio). This is an outstanding group of bonsai artists.

Added attractions of the Festival are the great selection of bonsai vendors, a masterpiece exhibit of members' bonsai, and five workshops. Two of the workshops are open workshops and three are material supplied. Workshop materials supplied are Ficus Nerifolia, Chinese Elm, and Cranberry Contoneaster. Check your registration form for workshop leaders and prices.

Future Meetings

 

February 15- Chase Rosade

March 3-10 - Flower Show

March 29- Pauline Muth

April 26- Yusui Mitsuya

May 10- Jim Gillespie

June 9 - Annual Picnic & Auction

President's Notes

Hello members,

We are finally seeing a little winter, and the snow sure looks nice on all the trees around the property.

Well, this is the time of year when I have to start my campaign for the trees for the Flower Show. The workshop for the show is Saturday January 19th at Howard's, as noted in our last newsletter. We still need 11 trees to complete the display, so if you have a tree, bring it to the workshop for professional assistance with the art of displaying. This workshop is the meeting for January, we return to our regular schedule in February.

Please call Linda Brant if you wish to be a sitter for the exhibit at the show.

I am looking forward to seeing all the new trees for the show at the workshop, so come on down and have some fun cleaning up the trees.

See you there, and thanks for your support,

Randy

 

 

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February 2002

February Meeting

As we all know, mid-February is not the best time to be working on trees, so what better way to avoid the doldrums than to visit the Far East to view some spectacular bonsai. This month's meeting will feature Chase Rosade, who will share videos of his fall trip to Japan, Taiwan, and Malaysia. The Asia-Pacific Bonsai Convention was held in Malaysia, and the bonsai exhibit there was reported to be nothing short of spectacular. Be sure to attend this month-it's a rare opportunity to not only see some terrific bonsai, but to hear some pertinent comments from an acknowledged bonsai master.

Speaker: Chase Rosade

Date: Friday, February 15

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

Time: 7:30

Special note: The society has purchased an exhibit-quality bonsai, which will be on exhibit at the Flower Show. The tree will be raffled at the June picnic. Tickets may be purchased at any meeting. Double ticket bonus does not apply to this raffle.

January Meeting

The January workshop was a success, thanks mainly to the members who braved the snowstorm in order to attend. President Naftal was delighted with the turnout, and reports that we now have the needed number of trees for the exhibit. Preparing the trees for the Flower Show means that everything has to be cleaned up, wired, and pruned. We'll look forward to see the trees in the PBS exhibit at the Flower Show, March 3-9.

Thanks to Howard McNeal for hosting the workshop.

Flower Show Notes

 

There's less than a month to go until the Philadelphia Flower Show. As always, we need members to volunteer to man the exhibit throughout the entire show. Please give Linda Brant (610-948-6380) a call and volunteer for exhibit sitting. There are still a few spots that need filling. If you're a new member, Linda will pair you up with a veteran for sitting.

MidAtlantic Symposium

Remember to mark your calendar for the upcoming MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 19-21, 2002. This year's line up features bonsai artists Yasuo Mitsuya (Japan), Dan Barton (Great Britain), Kathy Shaner (California), Ed Trout (Florida), and Dale Cochoy (Ohio). This is an outstanding group of bonsai artists presenting a diverse program.

Added attractions of the Festival are the great selection of bonsai vendors, a masterpiece exhibit of members' bonsai, and five workshops. Two of the workshops are open workshops and three are material supplied. Workshop materials supplied are Ficus Nerifolia, Chinese Elm, and Cranberry Contoneaster. Check your registration form for workshop leaders and prices.

Remember, your participation in this event directly benefits PBS. Our participation last year was very good, so let's try to do as well again this year.

President's Notes

 

Hello members,

The Flower Show Workshop was quite the success considering the weather we had. We started early enough to get a few hours in and pick trees for the show. We finally have all the trees we need, thanks to the brave members that traveled a long way to join us. Mike Marinelli came from New Jersey, Jim Riley came from Lancaster and everyone else from in between. Again, the club thanks you for your support and Howard and myself thank you. I'm happy not to have to ask for more trees. Thank you Howard for hosting and participating with styling and care for the members trees.

If you are still interested in sitting at the show, please call Linda Brant and to arrangements.

I'm looking forward to seeing you at our meeting on the 15th, Chase Rosade will be our speaker.

 

Talk to you soon,

Randy

Bonsai Tips - Winter

What can you do with you bonsai during these cold months? Now is an excellent time to take inventory of the things you'll need to have ready when the growing season starts. Do you have the fertilizers needed? How about insecticides and fungicides? Pots in good order? How about wire? What trees will need repotting? Do you have enough bonsai soil for this spring's repotting. Any wiring that can be done now? Do your tools need any attention - sharpening or cleaning?

Repotting may be done in the next few weeks Late February and early March), IF you can be sure the temperature in your storage area will not go below freezing. Most trees can be wired at this time, too, but be careful of brittle branches. Trees kept in garages or breezeways may start to bud later in March, and the routine of 'out during the day and in at night' will begin.

It's very important that you keep an eye out for bonsai that may be drying out, either those stored inside or those stored outdoors. Many of the tree losses occur during the next month or so due to lack of water. Just one or two warmer days can wreak havoc with stored trees.

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road!, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Bright Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.******

 

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March 2002
March Meeting

This month PBS will feature a lecture/demonstration by Pauline Muth. Pauline hails from West Charlton, New York, where she has operated her studio, PFM Bonsai for the last eleven years. Pauline has traveled extensively in connection with bonsai, both studying and lecturing. She has authored articles for "Bonsai OnLine Magazine", served as President of Mohawk Hudson Bonsai Society, sat on the Board of Directors of MidAtlantic Bonsai Societies, and is a current member of the Board of Directors of the American Bonsai Society. Last year, she was honored as one of the finalists of the JAL World Bonsai Competition.

Pauline's choice of material for her presentation will be Shimpaku juniper, with which she will demonstrate the process of creating a raft-style bonsai. For those unfamiliar with this style, it is one in which a single tree is used to create a planting with the appearance of a forest. Each branch becomes a trunk for the new forest while the former trunk is buried in the soil. It's a unique style, one which enables the stylist to utilize a tree with poor branch placement, reverse taper, or some other flaw which would render it useless as traditional bonsai, in a most artistic way.

As usual, the demo material will be raffled, and you can double your chances by bringing in one of your bonsai for display. Also, tickets will be sold for our special raffle, one of the exhibit trees. (Double tickets are not applicable to the special raffle).

Speaker: Pauline Muth

Date: March 29

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

Time: 7:30

February Meeting

Travel videos are supposed to be boring. We've all sat through family slide shows, movies , and videos, and fought to keep our eyes open. February's presentation by Chase Rosade was certainly the opposite. Chase and Soli traveled to Japan, Taiwan, and Malaysia on this trip and visited some outstanding bonsai gardens and nurseries.

In Japan, they were guests of Mr. Iwasaki, a bonsai "hobbyist" who has cultivated thousands of white pines for bonsai. They are grown in the ground, and when ready for training, are dug and potted. Mr. Iwasaki also has a very large number of junipers, which have had shimpaku grafted onto San Jose bases. Chase's pictures showed an unbelievable number of these pines and junipers in bonsai pots, displayed in an area adjacent to Mr. Iwasaki's guest house.

On to Taiwan, as guest of Mr. I.C. Su and his wife Helen, who reside in Taipei. Mr. Su has an outstanding collection of tropical bonsai as well as extensive collections of suiseki and antique bonsai pots. His entire rear yard is given over to bonsai display. Of special note were many large junipers which displayed twisted and contorted trunks with large bands of shari, leaving only minimal living material on the trunks.

The final stop only the Rosade tour was in Malaysia, for the Asia-Pacific Bonsai Convention. The convention boasted an exhibit of over four hundred bonsai, many of which were in the "to die for" category. Showcased were some huge ficus, which were refined to the nth degree. One notable tree species that Chase pointed out was the pemphis, which makes a really attractive tropical bonsai.

One very unusual feature of the convention that Soli pointed out was that in addition to the convention registration, admission was charged to each of the lecture/demonstrations.

We'd like to thank Chase for sharing his videos with us. It's rare that we get such an up-close view of bonsai events and displays, and it's even more special when a master such as Chase is our tour guide. Thanks a million, Chase!

MidAtlantic Symposium

Mark your calendar and register for the upcoming MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 19-21, 2002. This year's line up features bonsai artists Yasuo Mitsuya (Japan), Dan Barton (Great Britain), Kathy Shaner (California), Ed Trout (Florida), and Dale Cochoy (Ohio). This is an outstanding group of bonsai artists presenting a diverse program.

Added attractions of the Festival are the great selection of bonsai vendors, a masterpiece exhibit of members' bonsai, four exhibit critiques, and five workshops. Two of the workshops are open workshops and three are material supplied. Workshop materials supplied are Ficus Nerifolia, Chinese Elm, and Cranberry Contoneaster. Check your registration form for workshop leaders and prices.

Your participation in this event directly benefits PBS. Our participation last year was very good, so let's try to do as well again this year. Hope to see you there!

President's Notes

Hello Members,

Once again we have an excellent exhibit thanks to our members. As you know, it takes a great deal of patience and hard work along with putting in a few long and tedious days to pull it all together. Thanks to (in order of the trees exhibited) Mike Marinelli, Howard McNeal, Frank Thomas, Dominick Haigh, John Weiseman, George Gracey, Sherman Perkins, Jim Riley, Ed Coburn, Howard again, Solita Rosade , Jim Riley again, Mark Maher and Roger Lehman for putting trees in the show and helping with set up.

A special thanks to Howard McNeal for conceptualizing the center display. As usual, it creates the interest and spirit of what we enjoy sharing with the people who have come to love our exhibit and look forward to seeing each year. Thanks to Mr. Ly for lending us the fine material for the center display. I will never know how Howard talked him into it.

Thank you Jim Brant and Jim Gillespie for loading and unloading all the items we brought to the exhibit, and thank you Linda Brant for arranging the sitters for the long week.

To the sitters, a list too long to put in writing. Thank you for volunteering to watch our trees and keeping them safe. And answering all the repeated questions you are asked over the 3 hours you sit. The most asked..."What is training"? Thank you for your patience and willingness to educate the public.

Again thank you all, see you at our next meeting.

 

Randy

Future Meetings

April 26- Yusui Mitsuya
May 10- Jim Gillespie
June 9 - Annual Picnic & Auction

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road!, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Bright Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.******

 

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April 2002

 April Meeting

This month's meeting will be a combined meeting with BSLV. Our featured speaker will be Mr. Yasuo Mitsuya. Mr. Mitsuya, is an internationally acknowledged professional Bonsai Master and Teacher from Toyohashi, Japan. He personally owns some of the finest Bonsai in Japan. His formal training and experience have enabled him to become an exceptional contemporary styling artist and expert horticulturist. Mr. Mitsuya is particularly known for his work with conifer material in the "Gendai" (contemporary) design form. He has toured world wide advocating techniques for this styling form. Mr. Mitsuya last visited with us in 1995, and his finished bonsai was truly exceptional. We have the additional bonus of the translation services of Mrs. Kathy Shaner, who is a true bonsai master in her own right.

This meeting promises to be an exceptional experience for all members. Due to space limitations, we are requesting that you not bring trees for exhibit. Double raffle tickets are not in effect for this meeting. Mr. Mitsuya's demonstration material will be raffled. Also, you may buy tickets for our June raffle at this meeting.

Speaker: Yasuo Mitsuya

Date: Friday, April 27

Location: Meyer's Family Restaurant, Quakertown, PA*

Time: 7:30

March Meeting

Our March meeting featured Pauline Muth, who presented an excellent demonstration on raft-style bonsai. Using a Shimpaku juniper, which really couldn't be used for a "normal" bonsai, Pauline took us through the steps necessary to create a convincing forest using the rafting technique. Her technique involves using pegboard as an anchor for wires holding the branches down. The board usually rots away within a year or two, and by then, the buried branched have taken root. The finished forest will still need fine wiring later on, but the overall design was really nice. Thanks for a great program, Pauline!

Our raffle winner was Dick Bertolet.

(The following was provided by Pauline - Ed)

A Bonsai Close Up On Raft Style&emdash;Ikadabuki

By Pauline Muth copyright 1999

In this style of bonsai, the artist emulates the tree that has fallen in the woods and over time has rooted in the debris of the forest floor. The branches reach up to the light and each branch forms itself to resemble an individual tree. The all over appearance is of a string of trees or mini forest attached along a single connecting root or several roots from the same root mass. The root, of course, is the original trunk that the branches develop from. The trunk may have some bends creating a sinuous raft or may be straight. If the trunk is flexible, you can wire it and add dimension to the final product by bending the trunk to give it more shape. The branches that eventually look like trees, arise from the front, back and top of the fallen trunk. The more varied the positioning of the new trunks, the better the forest design will show depth.

To create this style in a pot, we lay down a one sided tree keeping most of the tree's roots in the soil. If there are any branches on the side we are laying down, they must be cut off. When the tree is laid down in a long pot, the upright branches are then trained as upright trees in a forest style. Be sure that the branches that are chosen are not in a direct straight line to assure some depth to the planting.

A scraping of the trunk where it will lie down and treating the wounds with wood rooting compound will facilitate root development. The soil mix should be rich enough to stay moist easily without being wet. You must secure the trunk to the soil in such a way that movement will not be possible for a couple of years. Set up multiple wires in the bottom of your tray to tie in the trunk well. The use of plastic tubing over the wire will prevent damaging the trunk when you wire it in place on the tray for species that damage easily. Remember that some trees have spiral vascular tissue that could lead to problems with keeping the branches alive when you bend the trunk to the soil. Pulling a bit of the bark where you scraped it on the bottom will show the path the vascular tubes.

Wiring the branches that will become trees can be done prior to bending the tree over. If you do the new trunk wirings before laying the tree down, it will be easier because the tree will still be firmly rooted in its pot. Develop the trees with distinct sizes and shapes. The largest, thickest branch should be the number one tree. Each tree should become part of a forest grouping with as much depth as possible. Ideally it should not be an end tree but should be within the forest group. The tree heights should decrease as the diameters decrease.

Once the trunk is tied down, arrange the new branch trunks as the forest trees. Then wire and arrange the branches on each tree.

As time passes and the roots develop on the bottom of the trunk, you will slowly reduce the top of the original root ball. Be careful not to do this too soon. You could kill your new trees that are being fed by those original roots. The younger the original material, the less chance you have of branch damage. Be sure to protect the original root ball so that the tree will receive enough water and nutrients while new roots are developing. Also continue to style and develop the forest as the roots are developing. A good system can take years to form. Watch the wires carefully and cut them away before damage occurs. If you used a wire to shape the trunk, it bears careful observation. The tie wires must need loosened to allow for growth but then must be refastened to prevent delicate new roots from being damaged.

A simply made training tray can help you develop a great raft planting. Using strips of lumber for sides and pegboard for the bottom, a training pot can be made that will allow you to easily fasten down the tree.

Future Meetings

May 10- Jim Gillespie - Lecture/Demo

June 9 - Annual Picnic & Auction

President's Notes

Hello Members,

As I am writing this, summer weather is starting early. At this point all trees should be out, if you live south of Jim Gillespie. The last few days of rain showers certainly helped green up the grass and trees.

At our last meeting, Pauline Muth worked on a Shimpaku and designed a raft planting. Thank you Pauline for sharing your knowledge with us. I was looking at some wild cedars over the weekend and they seem to be perfect for raft style, and they're all over the place. Happy digging.

Our next meeting is a shared meeting with the Lehigh group. We will be back at Myers in Quakertown to see Mitsuya. Those of you who have not been to Myers, the food is good and if you get there early you can have dinner before the lecture. Those of you who have not seen Mitsuya, well you're in for a treat. We will not be doubling the raffle this meeting there is not ample space for members to bring trees.

I am looking forward to seeing you all there.

Randy

The follwing is an excerpt from "Diplomatic Mailbag", the BCI Ambassador's Newsletter - Ed.

Refuge in a Sea of Insanity -A Note from Jerusalem

Subsequent to repetitive unsuccessful attempts at locating Arab Bonsai colleagues in my area willing to communicate with me (see BCI Diplomatic Mailbag, 1998 and 2000), I have not been blessed with the firsthand opportunity to speak about Bonsai as an instrument of peace. I can, however, speak of Bonsai as an anchor to sanity!

Today is the second day of Passover, one of the most important and spiritual Holidays in Judaism--a holiday when we are commanded by Scripture to be happy. But last night 21 Jews were slaughtered and another 150 wounded by a Palestinian

Suicide bomber who exploded himself in the midst of a traditional Seder celebration in a hotel in the coastal city of Natanya. A few hours later, another terrorist massacred 4 Iraelis celebrating the holiday in their home in a northern village. This morning this dirty deed was repeated in a village in the south, killing 2 Israelis. As I write this, my army, of whom I am still a volunteer reserve member at age 65, has reentered the Palestinian Territories, in yet another attempt to quell the rash of terrorism.

This morning, as a traditional Jew, I attended prayer services at the local synagogue (which is on terrorism alert), but found few answers there. After all, the terrorists kill us in the name of the same God that we worship! After breakfast, I find myself in my garden tending my Bonsai, and here I find the most solace.

My Bonsai garden looks like any other in the world (perhaps a little more unkempt!), and working in it, I look like any other bonsaist. The difference is that I tend my trees with a pistol on my hip, since after all, my village is no different from those already hit by terrorists. My three beautiful grandsons live a stone's-throw from us, and I worry for their safety, let alone for their future. I really don 't know how I would stay as sane without my Bonsai. They allow me to enter instantly into a better world, and almost forget entirely the horrors I may likely hear on the next news broadcast, the sound of military helicopters frequently overhead, or the shooting I repeatedly hear from the Bethlehem area, which is only a short distance from us as the crow flies, on the other (Palestinian) side of the 1967 "border".

The Jewish tradition proclaims planting as one of the sincerest possible declarations of faith in the future. So it is with Bonsai. As Iwork with my trees, I affirm my belielf that next year I will still be around to perform their spring training - an invaluable comfort, given the realities of the situation.

Dr. Eliezer Shenhav, President and Ambassador, Jerusalem Bonsai Club

---Directions to Meyer's Family Restaurant --Quakertown, PA

From (E-W)PA Turnpike--Exit 26 to rt. 309 North. Follow 309 to Quakertown. Meyer's Restaurant is on rt. 309 approximately 1 mile north of the 309 - 663 -313 intersection (formerly Trainer's Corner) on the right.

Probably the easiest for most people.....

From Northeast Extension of PA Turnpike---North to Quakertown Exit. After toll, turn left onto 663 East. Go approximately 4 miles to rt. 309. Turn left onto 309N, go about 1 mile. Meyer's is on the right.

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May 2002

May Meeting

Our May meeting features a leture/demonstration by one of our own outstanding members, Jim Gillespie. Jim has been immersed in Bonsai for twenty-seven years, and has operated Sho Fu En Bonsai for the last twenty. Jim has been featured in many club programs in the area, and was a featured artist at MidAtlanic. He is a past president of both PBS and BSLV and serves on the Board of directors for both Mid Atlantic and PBS. He is a member of five bonsai clubs and the Delaware Valley Bonsai Study Group.

Jim always provides a wealth of information from his storehouse of knowledge, as well as great bonsai artistry, so be sure you make plans to attend. Demo material for the evening will be raffled.

 

Speaker: Jim Gillespie

Date: Friday, May 10

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

Time: 7:30

April Meeting

This month's meeting was a tremendous one. Our featured speaker, Yasuo Mitsuya, performed his bonsai magic on a zuisho (white) pine. While Mr. Mitsuya pruned and wired the material, we received an on going commentary covered many facets of bonsai from Kathy Shaner. Kathy covered a wide range of bonsai facts, from soil types to wiring and grafting techniques. Mr. Mitsuya added to the information with valuable insights based on his own vast experience. He reduced the tree from a six-foot height to about 32 inches. While the tree appeared leggy as presented, Mr. Mitsuya is confident that with proper pruning and pinching techniques, the tree will bud back very strongly, and the tree can be reduced by half in width within the next few years.

It was an absolute pleasure to watch a true master at work - Mr. Mitsuya's ability to focus upon the tree before him is incredible. When the finished wiring was completed, members of the audience we able to inspect how proper wiring technique is utilized. Each and every branch was wired and postitioned perfectly. Mr. Mitsuya excels as both a demonstrator and as a teacher, readily sharing his knowledge and techniques with all - contrary to our perception of the Japanese masters as secretive. He readily fielded questions from the audience and stated that he is pleased to see so many Americans involved with bonsai and eager to add to their bonsai knowledge - in Japan, other than the professional masters, there is not such a wide practice of bonsai as he has seen here in the USA.

Both our guests provided us us with a great evening - for a room full of bonsai enthusiasts, Mr. Mitsuya and Mrs. Shaner gave us plenty of information to discuss and to think about. Our thanks to both for a delightful evening. Special thanks to Chase and Solita Rosade and Jim Gillespie for hospitality and transportation for our speakers.

Raffle winner for the evening was Jeff Shafer.

June Picnic & Auction

Closing out our program year is never something we look forward to, but the annual picnic and auction provides us with an enjoyable end to the year. Each year we ask members to donate material, tools, finished bonsai, pots, books, or any bonsai related item to the auction. This is our only fund-raiser for the year, and proceeds from the auction are applied to the coming year's programs and demo material. Please give generously to the auction, and provide the necessary support to the Society.

MidAtlantic Symposium

The 2002 Festival was a great success. Great speakers and seven demos were well received by a large turnout of attendees. We had a great PBS representation, and two PBS members won raffle trees - Solita Rosade and Linda Brant. Thanks to Mike Marinelli and Mark Maher for displaying their trees in the exhibit

Nest year's festival will mark MidAtlantic's twentieth anniversary, so watch future newsletters for Festival updates - the program is sure to be one of the best ever.

 President's Notes

 

Hello members,

We had an excellent demo / lecture this past week. Mr. Mitsuya from Japan and Kathy Shaner from California. Those of you that were with us got a real treat. While Mr Mitsuya was working on a white pine, Kathy was lecturing on bonsai care for the tree as well as soils, fertilizers and interpeting what Mr. Mitsuya was saying.

This month will feature Jim Gillespie and the material will be a surprise(we are still waiting for his trees to thaw out).

Now that the rest of us have our trees out it is high time to be fertilizing our trees. Use only natural fertilizers, Rape Seed Cakes, Fish Emulsion, Seeweed Emulsion etc. Chemical fertilizers create too much salt over time and can be dangerous to the health of your trees.

Don't forget to purchase your tickets for the Hinoki Cypress that we will be raffling at our picnic & auction in June. You can buy as many as you want before or at the auction.

See you all on the 10th.

Randy

Dues Reminder

The 2001-2002 year is drawing to a close. Dues for the upcoming 2203-2003 membership year are due at the end of May. Please help us to keep reminders to a minimum by submitting your dues at the May meeting, or by using the attached form to mail dues in to our Treasurer.

Address:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 17477

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road!, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Bright Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.******

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June 2002

June Picnic & Auction

Our last meeting for the 2001-2 year brings us to the Annual Picnic and Auction. Hosts Chase and Solita Rosade have promised us wonderful weather for this year's picnic and auction.

Each year a good deal of great bonsai material, pots, books, tools, and other bonsai related items come up for auction. Lots of spirited bidding is the result of so many quality items. This year should be no exception - quite a few pots donated by the estate of Ed Watzik will be on the auction block, as well as other items generously donated by other members. Please be sure to check your collection. Maybe a tree that's just not coming the way you'd like would be treasured by another. Perhaps that pot that's been collecting dust on the shelf all these years has the exact right tree waiting for it - in someone else's collection! Give them a chance at happiness! That tool you bought but never used, has a buyer just waiting for it this weekend. The auction is our prime fund-raising event. Without your donations and participation, the wonderful speakers we're used to seeing won't be there.

Please bring your own lunch and a dessert to share. Grilles will be available for cooking, and beverage will be provided. Please bring your own chair.

See you there!!

Annual Picnic & Auction

Date: Sunday, June 9

Time: Picnic - 1:00

Auction - 2:00

Location: Rosade Bonsai Studio - 6912 Ely Rd. New Hope, PA

Phone: 215-862-5925

May Meeting

Our May meeting featured a lecture/demonstration by Jim Gillespie. Jim's topic for the evening - (This Old Tree"?) was a bonsai done in the tanuki , or phoenix graft style. This style is created by combining live material with a piece of dead wood. The live material is brought up the trunk (the dead wood) and placed to simulate branches. In theory, this is an easy style, but in practice, a convincing tanuki is difficult to achieve.

Jim described several aspects that need consideration in working successfully with this style;

1A. Preparation - trunk (dead wood)

Cleaning and smoothing - bark and frizz should be removed

Preserving the dead wood - apply lime sulphur followed by wood hardener - this should both enhance and preserve the dead wood.

Modification - branches may be glued on to create jin

Base support - a flat base on the deadwood is necessary. Support for the dead wood can be created using a quick-setting cement.

Determining where the live material will be placed on the deadwood. Use a "Sharpie" marker to mark where the groove will be cut in the wood to place the live material.

1B. Preparation - live material

Remove the soil - trim and wrap the roots in wet sphagnum moss to prevent drying, then wrap in plastic

Trim unnecessary branches

Qualities necessary

Trunk

Dead wood should be durable, show good movement, and generally, be of an interesting form

Live material

Flexibility - the live material may be bent to quite a degree, so the ability to bend without breaking is essential

Branch placement - there should be enough branches so that a choice can be made as to which branches to remove and which to use,

Growth habit - the live material should be of a variety that is a fairly rapid grower. The faster the material swells into the dead wood, the better.

Once the initial planning and preparation were completed, Jim brought out the tools and using a rotary tool, carved a groove in the dead wood to place the trunk of the live material, (Shimpaku). Jim suggested a variety of methods for attaching the Shimpaku, including brads, staples, tape, and several other possible methods. Once the Shimpaku was placed in the groove and fastened, branch placement followed. Several smaller grooves were cut for the branches.

Mark Maher won the raffle, and Jim promised to give the finished tree to Mark - judging from the appearance of the almost finished tree, Mark may have a hard time getting it back from Jim.

Thanks, Jim, for a most informative and interesting evening.

President's Notes

Hello members,

If you missed our last meeting, Jim Gillespie the human encyclopedia, provided more information on the importance of having the right tool for the right job than we have seen in a long time. In addition, he demonstrated the use of most of his tools during the lecture. He used electric grinders, sanders, cutting and drill attachments, a torch and an array of others. A very informative evening it was, thank you Jim for hauling your entire collection of equipment to the meeting. (This is the web site for Lee Valley, the place where you can order all of the tools Jim had at his demo, including the torch for $25.95.

http://www.leevalley.com

I'm looking forward to our next meeting, our picnic / auction. This is our annual fund raising meeting, so if you have anything bonsai related, books, trees, pots, etc. that you would like to donate, please bring it for auctioning. The money we raise goes to bringing in the demonstrators and excellent lectures we have all year.

Don't forget, you must renew your membership to participate in the auction. You can sign up at the picnic, please see Linda Brant. We appreciate your support, thank you.

Hope to see you all at Chase Rosades on June 9th for the closing of another fine year.

Thanks again,

Randy

Dues Reminder

The 2001-2002 membership year is at its end. Dues for the upcoming 2003-2003 membership year were due at the end of May. Check your address label. If 01 appears in the lower right corner, we haven't received your dues. If 02 is in the lower right corner, you dues are current. Please help us to keep dues reminders to a minimum by submitting your dues at the June picnic, or by using the attached form to mail dues in to our Treasurer.

Address:

The Pennsylvania Bonsai Society

Box 801

Spring House, PA 17477

Directions to Rosade Bonsai Studio

Central New Jersey - route 95 west to Rt 29 north to Lambertville, left on Rt 179 at light, cross bridge to New Hope. Turn right at first light Rt 32 north. Go 2 1/2 miles on Rt 32 to Ely Rd, turn Left on Ely for 1 mile - studio on left (sign) at end of long driveway.

 

  Philadelphia & South -I 95 north to last exit in Pennsylvania # 51- left at stop sign. follow signs and Rt 32 North for 10 miles into New Hope. From traffic light in center of New Hope continue straight (North on Rt 32 ) for 2 1/2 miles to Ely Rd on Left, 1 mile on Ely Rd to studio on left (sign)

  Philadelphia & West - Pennsylvania Turnpike East to exit # 27 (Willow Grove) North on Rt 611 approximately 10 miles just south of Doylestown . Exit right to New Hope Rt 202 North. Follow Rt 202 North to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn left North on 32 about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. studio o left at the end of a long driveway.

  Allentown and North - take the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike south to Quakertown exit #32. Go north toward Quakertown on Rt 663 (which becomes Rt 313 East) through Crosskeys to Rt 202 north. Follow Rt 202 north to exit (New Hope- Easton Rt 32) At stop sign turn North on 32 to about 1 1/2 miles to Ely Rd, turn left on Ely for 1 mile. studio on left at the end of a long driveway.

 

 

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July 2002

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September 2002

September Meeting

Our 2002-2003 membership year, which marks our 40th anniversary, will begin with a return visit from Walter Pall accompanied by his "partner-in-crime" Jim Doyle. Walter and Jim last appeared in October of 2001 and the tree that was created was exceptional. Walter is best known for his work with collected material, designing and carving powerful bonsai.

Walter's personal collection numbers more than 1000 trees, most of them collected European trees. Since 1985, Walter's trees have received more than 35 national and international awards. He has served as a Director of BCI and as Vice President of The European Bonsai Association, as well a board member of Bonsaiclub Deutschland.

We can expect the chips and sawdust to fly, a great deal of design and care information, a few corny jokes, and a great evening.

Be sure you make plans to attend. The demonstration material will be raffled, and you can double your chances of winning by bringing a bonsai for display.

As usual, any help or questions about your trees will be available before the start of the meeting.

 

Speaker: Walter Pall

Date: September 13

Time: 7:30

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

June Picnic and Auction

Beautiful weather, good food, good friends, and a great auction - what a wonderful way to wrap up the year! Our hosts, Chase and Solita Rosade, provided a shady, tranquil setting for our annual picnic and auction.

This year's auction offered a great selection of items, especially bonsai pots, thanks to donations from Dave Adler, Jan & Chantel Vagassky , and the estate of Ed Watsik. There were some real treasures, and bidders really got enthusiastic about their favorite items, so auctioneer Jim Gillespie had his hands full when bidding got intense.

The society would like to thank all who made such a great day possible - Chase and Soli for their hospitality, Jim Gillespie for serving a auctioneer, our record keepers, Mary Ann Naftal, Pat Morris, and Linda Brant, and all the members who attended, shared desserts and snacks, and donated auction items.

Seasonal Suggestions

Many trees are emerging from their mid-summer slow-down, and are beginning to prepare themselves for the coming winter. Food manufactured in the leaves is now beginning to be stored in the roots rather than facilitating vegetative growth. We can help the process by switching to a low nitrogen fertilizer for our last few feedings.

While the trees still require water, less is needed in these fall months. Monitor your trees carefully regarding their watering needs. Invariably, we get huge temperature swings between summer-type heat and fall coolness.

A trick relayed by Dorie Froning is to mix a small amount of suger into the water to enhance fall color. A ratio of 1 tablespoon per gallon of water seems to do the trick. If you have any kind of an ant problem, you may want to forgo trying this.

Check your trees for any hidden wire - wire that you forgot to remove after spring wiring. Don't try to unwrap embedded wire - you'll cause some real damage that way. Carefully cut each coil, then gently remove the embedded wire by lifting one end with a tweezer or pliers. Sometimes pushing the short length of wire back along the spiral will cause it to drop out or become easier to remove. If some of the cambium is exposed, cover the wound with cut paste. Wire that is too far embedded to remove safely should be left in place - severe scarring, however, could result.

Take a few moments with each tree to inspect for insect eggs. Often in the rush to get our trees into winter storage, we over look this inspection, then pay the price in the spring. On hot days with very low humidity, be especially alert for spider mite infestations. If your junipers are looking weak, check carefully for these little monsters - they can really weaken a tree quickly. You may see some small webs in the foliage. If not, place a piece of white paper under a branch, give the branch a gentle shake, then check the paper carefully. If you see some tiny red dots moving around, get after the trees with a miticide - most insecticides won't touch spider mites. Check the label and read directions. Usually, the best time to spray is in the early morning.

President's Notes

Hello Members,

We had a fine day at the picnic / auction. The weather was perfect and through some generous donations we had some good plant material and more pots than you could imagine. We had pots donated from Ed Watsik's collection, some never used and a handful of one of a kind pots from Japan and China including antiques. A donation of additional pots from the Vagasskys, were included.

Our auctioneer Jim Gillespie along with sidekicks John Weiseman and myself provided the slapstick humor along with a helping hand by Jim Brant.

Howard McNeal supplied everyone with grilled corn on the cob, delicious!

Chase and Soli hosted this year's picnic, and thank you from all of us for inviting the club to enjoy a day at your home and studio. Thanks also to the members for your generous donations to the auction.

The Hinoki raffle tree provided by Howard McNeal was won by Mark Maher (lucky guy).

Thank you Linda, Pat and Mary Ann for handeling the auction record keeping.

Last but not least, thank you members for coming out and supporting the club.

 

See you at the September meeting,

Randy

MidAtlantic Symposium

Don't forget to mark your calendar for the 2003 MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 11-13, 2003. Speakers will be announced soon. This year is the 20th anniversary for MidAtlantic, and some special speakers and events are planned for this year's convention. If you only attend one convention during the year, this should be the one to attend. Convention information, artists biographies, and photos of previous conventions are posted on the website.

http://midatlanticbonsai.freeservers.com

Dues Reminder

If your address label does not have 02 in the lower right corner, your dues have expired, and this will be your last newsletter. Dues ( $20.00 ) may be paid at the September meeting or sent to Dave Spirt. Our address is:

Pennsylvania Bonsai Society
Box 801
Spring House, PA 19477

We now have the capability of sending the PBS newsletter via email. If you'd rather receive your newsletter by email, drop me a line at jbrant@macol.net. You'll save the society some money and receive a printable copy the day it goes to press. Adobe Acrobat is required (most computers have it installed already).

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road!, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Bright Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.

 

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October 2002

 October Meeting

Azaleas bloom in the spring, but one good time to work on them is the fall. This October, we will be visited by David Kruetz, who is the proprietor of Satsuki Bonsai-en in Missouri. Dave has been involved in bonsai since 1990. He has hosted a weekend from 1996 to 2001 in St. Louis dedicated solely to Satsuki Azalea care and development with headliners such as Joe Harris , Alexander Kennedy, Fred Galle, Ben Oki, Tatemori Gondo, Jack Bacus, Boon Manakitivipart. Dave graduated from the El Dorado Bonsai three year Satsuki care and culture class and was granted a first level instructors certificate from the Japan Satsuki Association, a prestigious honor. He is a continuing student of Satsuki care and culture. He is a regular vendor at many bonsai conventions from coast to coast. Dave comments that "I wish I would have started in my 20's and not my 40's."

Dave will be giving an in-depth lecture-demonstration on the care, training, and styling of azaleas. As usual, the dem material will be raffled.

 

Speaker: David Kreutz

Date: October 11

Time: 7:30

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

September Meeting

Better than any Phillies or Flyers home opener, our September PBS home opener really scored with our bonsai fans. Walter Pall, ably assisted by his tour partner, Jim Doyle, created a masterpiece bonsai in the short space of a little over two hours. The material, Chinese juniper (variety robusta green) , had a massive trunk and plenty of foliage to work with. Walter and Jim pruned,trimmed, carved, burned, guy-wired, and detail wired to bring the tree to an artistic finished state. Some carving and pruning had been done on the tree three years ago to help develop closer branching and to reorient lifelines. The end result certainly showed the value of patience in developing bonsai material, as well as the skill of the artist.

John Weiseman was the evening's big winner, and none of us have ever seen a bigger smile than that of John's, even as he strained to get the tree into his car.

The following is an account of the evening's demonstration by Ray Koehler.

Walter Pall is known throughout the bonsai world as a fearless rule breaker.

A man who plays chess blindfolded to give him a three-dimensional feel for bonsai, he hikes to a different haiku.

As a gag before a demonstration crowd, he styled a tree with a hedge pruner. Admonished by a club official that he'd "go into history for the wrong thing," Pall replied, "Yes, but I'll go into history."

Another time, while using an acetylene/torch, he nearly burned down a monster elm.

Now perched at the apex of the bonsai scene, the engaging Austrian explained his unique philosophy during a visit to the Pennsylvania Bonsai Society at the start of its 40th anniversary year.

"Japanese bonsai rules are like traffic laws in Italy," he said. "You follow them if you like. But if you have a better way, you do that.

"Basically, they (the traditional bonsai rules) make a lot of sense. But my interpretation is: You can do almost anything ... if it looks beautiful."

As he remarked at a former visit: "There is no such thing as right or wrong (in bonsai). It is a matter of experience and taste."

For example, torching a tree, he explained, promotes flexibility, sterilizes and harden the wood, and gives the wood the appearance of age.

Pall's dislike of removing rough bark to enhance the beauty of a tree is another illustration of flying against popular belief in order to "do what I like."

"I feel if you clean the bark off a tree, you have created a transvestite," the demo man said. "A tree should show character. I like to leave the character on a tree."

Outside his home near the Swiss alps, Pall has nearly a thousand bonsai trees. Clearly, he doesn't have to worry about a market. "If I don't sell a tree," he shrugs, "so what!"

The tree Pall and his sidekick, Jim Doyle, selected was an 18-year-old landscape juniper, a "beast" salvaged from Doyle's Harrisburg-area nursery. (Pall likes to refer to challenging trees as "beasts.")

The object was to enhance the already powerful juniper by strengthening its trunk and creating a small crown. "It is my experience," he said, "that you take off a lot and make a small crown - and it will all grow out again."

The excitement Pall generates is due as much to artistic solidity as to the self-deprecating humor he sprinkles liberally throughout the demonstration.

Holding a hook-shaped scalpel used to sculpt jin, Pall remarked, ''I love this tool. It's American without the Japanese price."

Then, ruefully, "I also have a basement full of tools that are absolutely useless."

The trial-by-fire technique, he observes, is not as difficult as it appears although it takes practice. "We used to think only Japanese supermasters can do things like that (torching a tree). Actually, a hillbilly can do this."

As the demonstration ended, Pall observed, "I have not tried to create a bonsai. The result (of that) wouldbe a copy of a copy of a copy....a cookie-cutter tree.

`"What I try to do is find the natural trait of the tree I look at the tree and isolate its spirit. Then I go home and try to create something that has this spirit ... the same thing that gives me the feeling I had when I saw this tree in the mountains.

"Even though I know it is easier to follow the old rules, I would encourage you people to do something very different (in creating a bonsai).

"Breathe the spirit of these trees."

 

rck

MidAtlantic Symposium

Don't forget to mark your calendar for the 2003 MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 11-13, 2003. The 20th Anniversary celebration will showcase great bonsai artists. Scheduled to appear are Kunio Kobayashi, from Japan, Patrizia Capellaro de Milano, from Italy, and Colin Lewis, from the US. A special attraction will feature the three bonsai artists who headlined the very first convention. F. Chase Rosade, Dr. David Andrews, and William Valavanis will be creating bonsai simultaneously on similar material as one of the feature demonstrations.

This year's exhibit should be one of the best ever (hint: we'd like to show your tree this year.) Several exciting and unique workshops are also being offered . The vending area, as usual will tempt and delight you. All demonstration material will be raffled.

If you only attend one convention during the year, this should be the one to attend. Convention information, artists biographies, and photos of previous conventions are posted on the website.

http://midatlanticbonsai.freeservers.com

Future Meetings

November - Member's Auction March- Sitting-Flower Show

December- Holiday Celebration April - MidAtlantic Speaker

January- Exhibitors' Workshop May - Dale Cochoy

February - TBA June - Annual Picnic & Auction

Seasonal Suggestions

With the cooler days and nights now upon us, we need to start making preparation for the coming winter. (Sound like The Grasshopper and The Ant to you?) We should be seeing a frost about mid-month or so, so most of the trees will be shutting down with the exception of pines which will remain active a bit longer.

Once the leaves have turned on deciduous trees, their need for water drops drastically. You may safely cut back on watering at this time. Some of the conifers are still pushing growth, so maintain your watering schedule for them. A very light organic fertilization schedule may be followed into November, but remember to use one with very low Nitrogen (ex. 0-5-5or 1-10-10: Nitrogen is the first number).

Late October is a good time to do some pruning on the deciduous material, as well as do some needle plucking on pines. Many people do deciduous wiring now.

Inspect your trees for insect eggs. Many people are now using a light horticultural oil prior to winter storage. Remove as much moss as possible, especially from the trunks, if it has grown up the trunk during the summer. You can store the moss in an airtight container, or on a flat, and replant it in the spring. Enough spores should survive the winter to re-establish the moss in the spring.

Get your winter storage area ready before the cold stuff hits. Putting the trees away is enough of a chore without having to prep work in the cold, too.

President's Notes

Hello members,

Sorry I missed the opening meeting, I was told and I'm sure I'll see the photos, that the tree Walter worked on was spectacular. Congatulations to John Weiseman on being lucky enough to win his first raffle. I guess the wait was well worth it!

I trust you all had a good summer despite having to water your trees twice a day for July and August due to the extensive heat. My trees really slowed down during that time and now are greening up fast. Be sure to keep an eye on any trees you have with wire on them. This time of the year the trees swell quickly and the wire can start to cut into the wood in no time.

Harvey Gordon has not been able to come to our meetings and is living with his son in Overbrook. He has a nice place to enjoy his bonsai. Harvey has been a great contributer to the club, and over the years he has purchased a few truck loads of material at our auctions. I have been bringing him trees to work on over the summer, through generous members' donations he should stay busy for a while. In return, Harvey has donated a whole bunch of pots to the club which will be auctioned at our 80/20 auction this November. Thanks Harvey, from all of us at Pennsylvania Bonsai.

I'm looking forward to seeing you at our October meeting, till then, enjoy the foliage.

Randy

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road!, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Bright Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.

 

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November 2002

 November Meeting

This November's Meeting brings us to the Fall Auction (which has been absent for the last few years). The intent of this auction is to provide our members with an opportunity to buy and sell materials at an auction with 80% of the selling price going to the seller. Terms are; Absolute auction, no reserve. Previous auctions have been very successful, with a tremendous amount of great bonsai material changing hands. This is an opportunity to thin your collection, or to add some material to it for winter and early spring work. Bonsai, pots, prebonsai stock, tools, magazines, or any bonsai related item may be offered for auction. We hope to have a good turnout, both of sellers and buyers. Be sure not to miss this tremendous bonsai opportunity. Bring some things to sell and take home something you've bought. We're going to continue our Silent Auction this year with selected items being placed on a table and written bids submitted on a list. Check the lists as the evening goes on and make sure that yours is the winning bid when the close of that auction is announced. Items designated for silent auction (only) may have a reserve (minimum) price. All items sold at regular auction will be sold without minimums.

We reserve the right to limit items based upon available time.

This is a great evening and loads of fun, so try to add to the enjoyment with your participation, items to sell, and your enthusiasm.

 

Member's Auction

Date: November 15

Time: 7:00*

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus,Temple University

*Time: 7:00-10:00--(due to the time required to register buyers and sellers, we'll start auction registration at 7:00, with the actual auction starting as soon as possible).

Congratulations to Mary Ann and Randy Naftal, proud new parents of a beautiful daughter, Victoria Rose, who was born on September 24.

October Meeting

David Kreutz, of Satsuki Bonsai-En, provided us with a veritable master's course on the development of azalea bonsai at our October meeting. Dave is a graduate of the El Dorado Bonsai three year Satsuki care and culture class and was granted a first level instructor's certificate from the Japan Satsuki Association. The El Dorado class is conducted by Tatemori Gondo, who offers many new insights into azalea development and culture, and Dave spent the evening sharing these concepts with us.

Many of the techniques which Dave presented were new to many of us - but as Dave said 'there are many different ways to approach azalea development - this is but one of them'.

A brief summary of the course Dave took was that one takes an Aragi (basically a thick azalea trunk grown in the ground - raw bonsai stock) and, following a specific series of steps divided into three-year intervals, arrives at a show-worthy specimen at the ninth year.

Two major work periods are defined within this program; Mesuki (fall work) and Motebonomi (spring bud trimming).

The purposes of the work in fall (Mesuki) are:

to push growth into specific limbs by removing weak branches

to increase ramification

to do directional wiring and pruning

to remove unwanted or excess buds

to remove older leaves to admit light

to do structural trimming.

Fall work is done once the tree starts to go dormant, and is completed before the first hard freeze. Leaves behind the bud are removed, leaving just the bud and a cluster of leaves around the bud. If too many buds are present in one spot, all but one are removed, as too many spring flowers crowd each other out, keeping each other from attaining full bloom. Wiring of small limbs is done at this time, mainly to place movement in the branch, or to change its direction. Removal of small branches or water suckers is accomplished in the fall. Where three or more branches have pushed from one spot, a selection is made - down branches are removed if present, left, right, or center branch removed, depending upon growth direction desired. Emphasis is put on leaving one branch only in order to maximize sap flow through that branch. Large branch removal is best left for spring work.

Spring work can be divided into several categories, that of branch cutting, repotting, and spring bud trimming ((Motebonomi). Each category of work has some timelines. Branch trimming (based on Missouri timing) is done in the following manner. Heavy branches (father branches) are cut in March, secondary branches (son branches) are cut in April, tertiary branches (grandson branches) are cut in May. Dave cautions that heavy branch cuts should be spread over several growing seasons, with the first major cut being a "stub" cut, which will sprout suckers later in the season, and the second cut being done the following season close to the trunk. He further cautions that the final cut not be made concave, but rather slightly convex, which will allow the optimal callusing. He stated that it's most important the stub be as smooth as possible, and that the edges be scored with a very sharp knife. Cuts one-eighth inch and larger should be sealed. Kreutz likes a product called Top Jin, but states that cut paste will work as well.

Repotting, according to Kreutz, is done before the tree blooms, just as it is coming out of dormancy. He leaves the buds on until swelling is apparent, or even have some color showing, then removes them. The thinking here is that leaving the buds on after the repotting will encourage root growth.

Bud trimming is done in June, or before blooming occurs. The bud and the surrounding leaf cluster is cut, leaving just the base of the bud and the base of the leaf. This process encourages rapid development. This is done in the years when the tree is not repotted.

The processes of Fall and Spring work are done yearly, although repotting is done every third year. Full flowering is allowed every three years. All of these steps are only done on vigorous, healthy trees was the final caution given by Dave.

Some general recommendations and observations were given.

Winter storage (again in Missouri) - outdoor storage with wind protection , but sun exposure.

Fall wiring - just tip branch tips with loose coils - leave heavy wiring for the spring.

Soil - Dave uses straight kanuma, but offers that other soil mixtures may work. Since kanuma holds water so well, he can go longer without watering. He also top-dresses the soil with Yamagoki, which is a mountain moss similar to sphagnum, but with more desirable properties. This retains moisture in the soil and keeps the soil at a more constant temperature. He states that azaleas that stand in poor draining soil will soon die - that azaleas need to be in wet soil constantly is a myth. Satsukis hate continuous water on their roots.

Growing environment - Full sun under 55% shade cloth is Dave's preferred method. For those without shade cloth, he recommends bright sun with some shading in the afternoon hours of the day. He also provides as humid an environment as possible, by misting whenever possible, and by utilizing a gravel bed under his benches. He prefers to check each pot for moisture by lifting one end, rather than to do wholesale watering. His choice of fertilizers is limited to organics - fish emulsion and liquid seaweed (with iron and zinc added for color and strength), and fertilizer cakes.

Squeezing three years' worth of information into an evening lecture was quite a task, and Dave did it very well. The demonstration material for the evening was a substantial sized azalea and was won by Howard McNeal.

David encourages any questions and may be reached via email at satsukibonsai@juno.com .

Thanks David, for an informative and enjoyable evening.

Future Meetings

December- Holiday Celebration March- Sitting-Flower Show

January- Exhibitors' Workshop April - MidAtlantic Speaker

February - TBA May - Dale Cochoy

June - Annual Picnic & Auction

Seasonal Suggestions

The trees have dropped their leaves and now is a good time to do some of your pre-storage pruning. Needle plucking on pines may be done now, if you haven't done it already. Watering should continue, but only on an intermittent basis, enough to keep the soil from drying out completely.

The trees should be going into winter storage near the end of the month, before the first long freezing spell. Be sure that the trees go into storage with a thorough watering. Once the ground has frozen, watering need only be done on the warmer days, and only when the root ball has thawed. Wind and sun are the two big concerns during winter storage. Wind can cause desiccation, the loss of moisture in the twigs and branches, which the frozen roots cannot replace. Sunlight can cause the branches to break dormancy, but again, the frozen roots cannot supply food or water that is needed. Either situation can cause the tree to die. Keeping the pot in contact with the soil (for outdoor storage) may help to moderate the freeze-thaw cycle, as the roots are kept near the temperature of the soil, rather than that of the air. Mulching in of the trees can be done with an number of materials - wood chips, sawdust, leaves, straw, or pine needles. Mulch should be deep enough to cover the pot and some of the trunk. The pot and the bonsai soil may be kept clean of mulch by covering them with panty hose (ask first!!) or with cheesecloth. Both will allow moisture to pass through.

An application of lime sulphur or horticultural oil will help prevent fungus problems during storage, and minimize insect problems in the spring. Check for insect egg cases or cocoons as the trees are put away. If you haven't done so already, remove moss from the soil surface and tree trunks. A brass brush or old toothbrush may be needed to get moss off trunks and roots - don't scrub too hard and damage or expose the cambium.

Some people have had critter problems during winter storage; mice, squirrels, chipmunks, rabbits, moles, or deer may decide that bonsai are delicious. Moth balls or dried blood may help to discourage them. Check the trees as the winter progresses to be sure damge isn't being caused by these monsters.

MidAtlantic Symposium

Don't forget to mark your calendar for the 2003 MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 11-13, 2003. The 20th Anniversary celebration will showcase great bonsai artists. Scheduled to appear are Kunio Kobayashi, from Japan, Patrizia Cappellaro de Milano, from Italy, and Colin Lewis, from the US. A special attraction will feature the three bonsai artists who headlined the very first convention. F. Chase Rosade, Dr. David Andrews, and William Valavanis will be creating bonsai simultaneously on similar material as one of the feature demonstrations.

This year's exhibit should be one of the best ever (hint: we'd like to show your tree this year.) Several exciting and unique workshops are also being offered . The vending area, as usual will tempt and delight you. All demonstration material will be raffled.

If you only attend one convention during the year, this should be the one to attend. Convention information, artists biographies, and photos of previous conventions are posted on the website.

http://midatlanticbonsai.freeservers.com

President's Notes

Hello members,

If you were at our October meeting, you received a great deal of Azalea information, David Kreutz was extremely informative. He lectured the entire evening and touched the tree twice, once to put it on the turntable and once to remove a small branch. To be honest with you, it didn't make a difference if he worked on the tree or not. It was an excellent lecture, I left the meeting looking forward to the fall clean up and prep for my own Azaleas as well as adding a few more to my collection.

I'm exited about our next meeting, the 80/20 auction. We haven't had this auction in a few years and it is a wonderful opportunity to pick up some good material and other bonsai related items. See Jim Brant's notes on the specifics.

Speaking of Jim Brant, how about the new look to the newsletter and web site. He did a great job updating the look and as always does a superb job managing the site for the club. Thanks Jim.

See you all in November
Randy

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Dixon Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.

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December 2002

December Meeting

Friday the Thirteenth may be considered an unlucky day by some people, but for PBS members, it could be one of good fortune. This month's meeting is our annual Holiday Celebration, and one of the features of this meeting is the Holiday raffle, in which surprise after surprise awaits the lucky ticket holders. Who knows what terrific bonsai book, tool, pot, or accessory is hidden within the bright wrappings? Who will be the lucky recipient of the MidAtlantic registration? Who can figure out what package it is hidden in? Our program for the evening will be a lecture/demo, which we haven't confirmed with the speaker at press time. The demo material will be raffled, however.

Please bring a goodie to share with the group - cookies crackers, cheeses, dips, veggies, cakes, pies, or whatever.

Our Holiday Celebration is a wonderful tradition for all of our PBS members. Please join us and enjoy. We promise you'll have a good time!

Date: Friday, December 13

Holiday Social and Raffle

Location: Room 208, Dixon Hall, Ambler Campus, Temple University

Time: 7:30 pm

Remember to bring any tree that you want to discuss prior to the start of the meeting. Advice on styling, care, horticultural problems, pot selection, etc. can be obtained from other members before the start of the program.

November Meeting

 

After a few year's absence, the return of the Fall Auction was very well received. Everyone was really delighted that one of our main auction supporters, Harvey Gordon, was feeling well enough to join us for the evening. We've really missed seeing Harvey at the monthly meetings.

We had a great number of items entered in the auction, and some very special items available in the silent auction. There was a large number of bonsai pots of very good quality, as well as some good looking bonsai and pre-bonsai material. The bidding got fairly heavy for several desirable items, but a good sense of friendly competition prevailed.

Auctioneer Jim Gillespie kept things moving along, while giving everyone excellent information of a horticultural nature regarding the plant material being offered. Many thanks to Jim for his excellent efforts.

As a measure of the success of the auction, over $3000 was raised, with 80% , or $2400, of that being returned to the sellers. The Society benefited to the tune of $600, which will be applied to bringing the quality programs that PBS members have come to expect.

Future Meetings

January- Exhibitors' Workshop April - MidAtlantic Speaker

February - TBA May - Dale Cochoy

March- Sitting-Flower Show June - Annual Picnic & Auction

Seasonal Suggestions

 

With our trees going into winter storage, our bonsai activities seem to come to a standstill, and we now sit, eagerly anticipating the arrival of spring. Here are some suggestions to help sustain you over the next few months.

Take a tool inventory. Note any tools that may need replacement. Inspect your tools for sharpness. When the work season arrives, it gets frustrating to have to stop pruning to sharpen tools. Check your tools for rust and residual "gunk" - a few swipes with a cleaning block can do wondrous things for your tools. Be sure to give your tools a light oiling to keep them in good condition.

Check your bonsai pot supply. Most of us have far more pots than we can ever use. Set aside some of the ones that haven't been used since the Carter administration, and tag them for the June auction (you know you'll bring home more than you took, anyhow!). Those pots that are to be kept may need the lime deposits removed. Again, an abrasive cleaning block can be used to remove some of the deposits. For the stubborn deposits, try some white vinegar, or "Lime-away". For your better pots, test both methods in an unseen area, just to be safe.

Get your bonsai records up to date. It's nice to know when a certain tree was last repotted, or what year it was obtained. Since many years can go by before a tree is really ready for display, we can lose track of vital information on that tree without some form of written record.

Read everything you can relating to bonsai. There are some great new books on the shelves - pick one up at your favorite bonsai supplier and dig into it. Catch up on magazines, too.

If you really have the itch to work on a tree, get a tropical bonsai and spend some time working on it. Improve your wiring skills, prune away, and use one of those cleaned-up bonsai pots. Who knows, you may develop a second collection?

MidAtlantic Symposium

Don't forget to mark your calendar for the 2003 MidAtlantic Spring Festival to be held in New Jersey on April 11-13, 2003. The 20th Anniversary celebration will showcase great bonsai artists. Scheduled to appear are Kunio Kobayashi, from Japan, Patrizia Cappellaro de Milano, from Italy, and Colin Lewis, from the US. A special attraction will feature the three bonsai artists who headlined the very first convention. F. Chase Rosade, Dr. David Andrews, and William Valavanis will be creating bonsai simultaneously on similar material as one of the feature demonstrations.

This year's exhibit should be one of the best ever (hint: we'd like to show your tree this year.) Several exciting and unique workshops are also being offered . The vending area, as usual will tempt and delight you. All demonstration material will be raffled.

If you only attend one convention during the year, this should be the one to attend. Convention information, artists biographies, and photos of previous conventions are posted on the website.

http://midatlanticbonsai.freeservers.com

President's Notes

 

Hello members,

Due to contributions, deep pockets, and a good amount of material for our November 80/20 auction, the fund raiser was a complete success. As usual, Harvey Gordon out bid his competitors and left with a carload of merchandise.

Thank you Jim and Linda for arranging all the paperwork and keeping track of all the material supplied as well as registering all participants. It is a huge job and as usual a job well done. Dave Spirt took care of the bookeeping and Jim Gillespie was the entertaining auctioneer.

Our next meeting will be the holiday meeting and a great opportunity to get some excellent raffle prizes. The demo material will be raffled as well.

Don't forget to look over your material for the January Flower Show workshop at The Old Mill Bonsai Studio. You will have a chance to work on preparing your trees for the big show. If you are not putting a tree in the show, bring a tree to work on and enjoy the day with other club members. This is a good opportunity to get professional advice on show prep as well as mid winter styling. The workshop will start at 10 am and end around 2pm, lunch supplied.

I'm looking forward to seeing you all at the December meeting.

Randy

 

--Directions to Ambler Campus--

From PA Turnpike-Exit 26 to rt. 309 N.--Use Susquehanna Rd. exit--Turn Left onto Susquehanna Rd., proceed to Butler Pike. -- Turn right onto Butler Pike go 1/2 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd. --Turn right on Meetinghouse Rd. Go 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

From 309 south - Use Butler Pike exit--Proceed left onto Butler Pike, go 1/4 mi. to Meetinghouse Rd.-- Turn right onto Meetinghouse Rd. -Proceed 1/2 mi. to Ambler Campus.

Important Reminder ---park only in the lot on Meetinghouse Road, or behind Bright Hall(student lot). You may drop off passengers or meeting items in front of Dixon Hall, but parking is not allowed on the campus proper.

******We have been using what had been the exit road to get to Dixon Hall for drop off as the old Entrance road is blocked.

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